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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Moreau, David H
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Record #:
265
Author(s):
Abstract:
Municipal officials need state financial assistance to handle water supply and water quality concerns.
Source:
North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p66-74, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
771
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's Water Supply Watershed Classification and Protection Act was passed to protect county and municipality water supplies from increasing pollution and degradation.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Aug 1992, p17-21, bibl, f
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Record #:
15799
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Abstract:
Of the many changes brought about by passage of the amendments to the Water Pollution Control Act of 1972, the one having the greatest potential impact on urban planning is Section 208. Section 208 calls for areawide water quality management in all regions exhibiting complex water quality problems caused by urban and industrial concentrations.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Winter 1976, p35-40, il, f
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Record #:
18531
Author(s):
Abstract:
Regulating and supplying water to the state's citizens falls to state and local government which faced decreased federal support in the early 1980s. Lacking thorough information about the 500 municipally owned water systems, the author proposed a more detailed study of these systems to better inform future development. Mr. Moreau further suggests more state government involvement intended to give local government more capabilities for managing and planning specific water supplies.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
26382
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent proposals have suggested a state, regional, or river basin authority for water management in North Carolina. Proposals however, vary between emphasis on local governments versus those that would place less weight on the local component of management.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 23 Issue (26) 1, Winter 1979, p26
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Record #:
28948
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina local officials are at a crossroads in growth management, in financing new water and sewer projects, and in land use regulations. This article discusses how intergovernmental relationships are growing more complex, as are technical issues.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p66-74, il, f
Record #:
33165
Author(s):
Abstract:
The provision of water supplies of ample quantity and quality to sustain population growth and economic development can no longer be taken for granted. North Carolina is experiencing interstate competition for water, and a more active state role in planning for water supplies is in order.
Record #:
34084
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Durham, Apex, Cary and other municipalities in the Research Triangle either have been or soon will be facing shortfalls in their water supplies. This article discusses the current supply and demand for water, and the need for a more comprehensive approach to water management.
Record #:
34361
Author(s):
Abstract:
Given the experiences in North Carolina over the past decade with devastating hurricanes, there is concern over the protection of water supplies and how the state should respond to natural disasters, accidents, or contamination. This article discusses policies and emergency management in North Carolina.
Record #:
34362
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has an average annual rainfall of forty inches, but in recent years, widespread drought has raised concern over the abundance of water supplies. This article examines the current state of water supply and water use in North Carolina.
Record #:
34365
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is facing the possibility of having to conserve its public water supplies to protect against an uncertain rainfall-streamflow pattern over the next several months. As the state continues to experience rapid growth, demand for public water supplies tends to follow closely. This article discusses water supplies in Wake and Mecklenburg counties and the use of quarries for expanding reservoir capacity.
Record #:
34367
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists say that the most important and predictable water-related impacts of climate change on North Carolina is rising sea level. This has impacts on rainfall and streamflow, on which much of North Carolina’s water supplies are dependent. This article discusses the consensus of scientists and predictions in North Carolina.
Record #:
34369
Author(s):
Abstract:
On December 20, at the North Carolina Drought Management Advisory Council meeting, Governor Mike Easley stated he will bring thirty of the state’s worst hit water systems together on January 14, in Greensboro to review the status of these systems. The council will review plans for the drought and reserve sources of water.
Record #:
34368
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is experiencing a severe drought, and cities are questioning how bad its effects will be on public water supplies. This article discusses records of previous droughts in North Carolina and how conservation of water resources was addressed.
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