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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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17 results for Liner, Charles D
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Record #:
137
Author(s):
Abstract:
Liner presents ideas for increasing revenue for local governments.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 57 Issue 3, Winter 1992, p22-29, il, f
Record #:
315
Author(s):
Abstract:
Liner examines the problem of tax inequity for the poor and offers suggestions for correcting it.
Source:
North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 11 Issue 2-3, Apr 1989, p138-152, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
768
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two laws exist to aid schools with relatively low property tax bases and enrollments: the Low-Wealth Supplemental Funding Program and the Small-Schools Supplemental Funding Program.
Source:
School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p1-14, il, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
2109
Author(s):
Abstract:
From 1981 to 1993, over $3 billion was spent on public school construction and other capital needs. With projected costs for the next decade at $5.6 billion, school systems and counties are being scrutinized over their past spending toward stated needs.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 60 Issue 2, Fall 1994, p30-43, il, f
Record #:
2388
Author(s):
Abstract:
From 1981 to 1993, over $3 billion was spent on public school construction and other capital needs. With costs projected for the next decade at $5.6 billion, school systems and counties are being scrutinized over their past spending toward stated needs.
Source:
School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 26 Issue 1, Winter 1995, p1-5, il, f
Record #:
2387
Author(s):
Abstract:
Statewide public school enrollment will rise over the next ten years, but the enrollment growth rate will decline. Forty-five percent of school systems will have ten percent or more growth with the rest experiencing modest growth or decline.
Source:
Record #:
2863
Author(s):
Abstract:
Public school enrollment throughout the state will continue rising over the next decade, 1994-95 to 2004-05. A table of projected changes in the average daily membership of the state's 119 school units is included.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
3254
Author(s):
Abstract:
Public school enrollment in the state has increased 11 percent since 1990 and is projected to increase by 14.4 percent from 1995-96 to 2000-06. A table of projected changes in average daily membership of the state's 117 school units is included.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
4351
Author(s):
Abstract:
Declining public school enrollments for most school units appear at an end, as enrollments increased in the 1990-1991 school year. Enrollment statistics are gathered from the average daily membership, or ADM. The State Department of Public Instruction projects continuing increases during the next decade. Tables of projected changes in average daily membership of the state's 129 school units are included.
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Record #:
4357
Author(s):
Abstract:
The State Department of Public Instruction projects school enrollment mostly to increase over the next decade, 1992-93 to 2002-03. Of the state's 121 school units, 94 units can expect higher enrollment. Fifty-six of the 94 units can expect increases of 10 percent or more. Another 22 units can expect increases of 20 percent or more. Twenty-six units can expect some decline during the same period.
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Record #:
18123
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state and local governments of North Carolina finance their activities with a complex system of taxes, charges, fees, and interest from investments. This articles details this complex system.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Sept 1972, p6-22, f
Record #:
18179
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many of the problems faced by North Carolina local governments in recent history have resulted either directly or indirectly from nation-wide economic developments. Urbanization and demand for services, along with post war prosperity and industrialization have presented both new opportunities and new problems.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p4-8, f
Record #:
18235
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Governor's Commission on Public School Finance presented their report to the General Assembly in 1979. The biggest issue facing the state's public school system concerned the disparity of wealth distribution and how poorer communities had less to contribute. The article reviews the entire report and problems of financing the public school system in 1980.
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Record #:
18243
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to North Carolina law, tax assessors must try to appraise each property according to its \"true value in money\"--that is, the price at which the property would sell on the real market. Each property must be assess at this market value, which means property tax rates must fall on the full appraised market value. Before January 1, 1974, property was assessed at a percentage of appraised market value, according to the officially adopted assessment ration of the county in which the property was located.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Winter 1975, p29-35
Subject(s):
Record #:
18323
Author(s):
Abstract:
Liner examines the history of public school finance in North Carolina that is based on the principals state function and minimum standards of education.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 42 Issue 4, Spring 1977, p13-19