NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Lewis, Robert G
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4511
Author(s):
Abstract:
Appleton Oaksmith's life was one adventure after another - sea captain, suspected slaver, Civil War blockade runner, law fugitive, agent for foreign countries, and North Carolina state legislator. He settled in Carteret County in 1873 and was active in county business and political affairs.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1998, p20-29, il, por, f
Record #:
34534
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asa Gaskins was a resident of Carteret County in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Gaskins held a variety of jobs, including carpenter, fisheries worker, foreman, and school board member. Throughout these various careers, Gaskins continued to build houses for family and neighbors and aided in constructing the first Camp Glenn School in 1913 for children living in Camp Glenn. Gaskins’ children attended the school. Following the death of Asa Gaskins, the property remained in the family until the 1980s. Today, the school is the home of the Carteret County Historical Society.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 4, Fall 1994, p7-10, il, por, f
Record #:
34530
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1929, the North Carolina General Assembly authorized the creation of a State Highway Patrol. The Captain and his lieutenants used Camp Glenn, the former State Guard facility located in Carteret County, as a training camp for the patrolmen. The article further details responsibilities of the Highway Patrol and several cases in Carteret County. The Camp was used through 1931.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 3, Summer 1994, p6-9, il, por, f
Record #:
34560
Author(s):
Abstract:
Harkers Island, known as Crany Island during the 1700s, was a prominent location during the colonial period. John White, a 16th century explorer, was the first European to document the island—he describes some of the Coree living on the island, evidenced by shell mounds. By the early 18th century, British colonists were farming the island and had constructed several warehouses for cargoes associated with the island’s port. During the 1800s, many island residents worked in the regional whaling industry.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 11 Issue 1, Winter 1995, p3-11, il, map, f