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17 results for Lee, Misti C
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Record #:
6585
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Clinton, county seat of Sampson County, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. Clinton, an agricultural hub in the East, and Sampson County possess an agricultural history dating back two centuries. Much of this is preserved in the Sampson County History Museum. Lee discusses things to see and do on a visit in Clinton, including The Courthouse Inn, Fussell's Restaurant, and Courthouse Square.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 11, Apr 2004, p18-20, 22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6762
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Lee discusses El's Drive-In, a tiny mom-and-pop restaurant and an institution in Morehead City since 1954. The restaurant is small, being a mere 20-by-40 feet, and there are no talk-boxes to call in your order. Waitresses come out to the car just as they have done for fifty years. The business was founded by Elvin and Helen Franks and has made its mark on the city with its extra-thick superburgers and the famous shrimpburger.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p146-147, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6895
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Jacksonville, county seat of Onslow County, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The city dates back to the 1700s and is the state's eleventh largest city with over 66,000 residents. The Marine Corps arrived in 1941 and its presence remains today with Camp Lejeune, the largest Marine Corps amphibious training center in the country. Besides military history and tributes located in Jacksonville, visitors can visit the Lynnwood Park Zoo, the Coastal Plains Raceway Park, the Jacksonville Raiders semi-pro football team, and a variety of restaurants and shopping venues.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p18-20, 22-24, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7131
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Swansboro in Onslow County is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. Visitors are attracted to the town by its sense of history, quiet atmosphere, restaurants, and unique shopping. Restored buildings of a century ago house many shops. A statue of the town's most famous citizen, Otway Burns, a privateer during the War of 1812, stands in the Bicentennial Park.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7138
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Marietta Gardens, located in Robeson County, grows over 5,000 varieties of daylilies. The twelve-acre farm, owned by John and Faye Shooter, is known here and abroad for its wide variety of quality daylilies and for the new varieties introduced by the owners. Plants sell from $50 to $250.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p130-135, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7267
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Colored-pencil artist Kim Mosher, a resident of the Hatteras Island town of Buxton since 1987, draws her inspiration from the air and water that surrounds her island home. What she sees finds its way onto paper, tiles, and fabrics in vivid eye-catching colors. Many of her limited edition prints find an extended life on note cards, serving trays, decorative tables, and clothing.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p150-154, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7326
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The skipjack ADA MAE was built by Captain Ralph Hodges in Rose Bay, Hyde County, in 1915. Skipjacks, or two-sail bateaus, were dredge boats that supported the state's oyster industry. The ADA MAE is believed to be the only remaining skipjack built in North Carolina. It was found in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1994, by an East Carolina University graduate student who was working on a research project in Maryland. The ADA MAE is moored at Washington, North Carolina, where restoration work is being completed. It will be used there as a classroom to teach students about the oyster industry in the state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p118-122, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7371
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In 1987, the Museum of World Cultures at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington created the North Carolina Living Treasure award. The award is modeled after a similar program in Japan which holds up for national recognition the creative work of an individual. The award is one of the highest honors given in North Carolina to honor creative excellence. Since 1987, eleven North Carolinians have been honored with the award. Recipients include potters, a boat builder, glass and wood artists, musical instrument makers, and a gunsmith.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p118-120, 122, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7602
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North Carolina takes pride in being first at making national history in a number of ways. These include the first successful powered flight; first English settlement in the New World; first state or public university; first gold rush; first national seashore; first state-funded art museum; and the first book published by an African-American in the South.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006, p60-66, 68, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7630
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Lee undertakes a search of North Carolina to find the best chocolate creations. She lists places where most historical chocolates, the finest fudge and brownies, fried-and-true truffles, the most fun Tar Heel chocolates, the best hot chocolate, and the best chocolate pie, cake, bread pudding, milk, and pecan candy can be found.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p80-84, 86, 88-89, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7773
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During the Great Depression of the 1930s, the need for jobs was critical. Wilmington responded to the need by building the Community Drive, now known as Lake Shore Drive. This Depression-era project to build a five-mile road around Greenfield Lake and park in the downtown area created jobs for hundreds of men. Work began on November 24, 1930, and ended eighteen months later. The project funding was unique. Local residents who were fortunate enough to have retained their jobs agreed to fund the project through their own paychecks. Participants gave one day's salary every month. Over $110,000 was raised.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p116-120, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7793
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The North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores has been closed to the public for nearly three years. During that time, the $25 million expansion has tripled its space and increased the full-time staff from fourteen to forty. The planned date for reopening is May 19, 2006. During the closure, many of the animals were given away or loaned to other aquariums, science centers, and teaching facilities. The aquarium will be stocked with 3,000 aquatic animals, including jellyfish, river otters, tiger sharks, sea nettles, and triggerfish. A highlight of the Living Shipwreck exhibit will be a replica of the German submarine U-352, which was sunk off North Carolina in 1942 by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter ICARUS.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p146-148, 150, 152-154, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7995
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Famed maritime artist Robert Dance discusses his work. Dance was born in Tokyo, where his father was a businessman. Eight years ago he moved from Winston-Salem to Kinston. His reputation as a maritime artist is nationwide, and he is especially famous in New England. Bound for Blue Water, J. Russell Jinishian's recently published book of past and present American nautical painters, lists Dance among the best American marine artists of the 20th-century and into the 21st-century. Dance's works hang in the North Carolina Museum of Art; the Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, Connecticut; and numerous corporate and private collections.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p166-168, 170, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8133
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Lee takes the reader on a trip along N.C. Highway 24 where small-town charm and a country farm await. Stops include Petra's Kaffe House, Onslow County Museum, and Arnold's House in Richlands; Mike's Farm and County Store in Beulaville; and Thig's Barbecue House in Jacksonville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p226-230, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10891
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Lee describes a fun with food weekend in Carteret County's coastal communities from Morehead City to Salter Path.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 10, Mar 2009, p110-112, 114, il Periodical Website
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