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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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39 results for Lee, David S
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Record #:
745
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At certain times of the year, North Carolina's offshore waters host a great variety of marine birds.
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4429
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An oil/gas drill site, proposed by the Mobil Oil Corporation on North Carolina's Outer Continental Shelf, is a potential hazard to rare and globally endangered seabirds. The drill site area had been nominated as a globally Important Bird Area. The drill site would also affect the area's ecotourism, as a large birdwatching industry has developed on the Outer Banks. A number of endangered species and described by the author.
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4741
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Migrating hawks know by instinct when to start, where to go, and how to get there. Each fall they follow well- established routes across North Carolina's mountains and coasts. Lee describes watching hawk migrations over the Outer Banks and lists sites along the coasts and in the mountains where the hawks may be viewed.
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5241
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The American alligator is North Carolina's largest reptile and can weigh up to 600 pounds and measure 12 feet. The state is the northern limit of their range, but they are not numerous here and live mostly on the outer Coastal Plain. Lee describes these creatures and how they live.
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Record #:
13858
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Ugly and ill-tempered, snapping turtles are not the most pleasant members of turtle society, yet they are an important part of aquatic communities.
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Record #:
22358
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There are over 700 plants in North America that are known to toxic to people and animals, and poison ivy is but one of them. Lee covers how the poison works, how a person can get poison ivy, what to do if a person gets it, and what is the best way to avoid getting it.
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22392
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In a unique approach to an article on birds, Lee takes a look at Shakespeare's plays and how he used birds \"to enhance his thoughts regarding superstition, tradition, the human spirit, and the beauty of nature.\" His use of birds far exceeded any of his contemporaries, either playwrights or authors. There are sixty-four kinds of birds mentioned in his combined works and they appear over six hundred times. About fifty of the birds are known to people living in the Eastern US.
Record #:
9462
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Since 1975, the North Carolina State Museum of Natural History has been gathering information on the status of the panther in North Carolina. Much of this information is based on sight reports. This article explains and summarizes the preliminary results of the study.
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Record #:
9521
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The authors discuss species of wildlife that once lived in North Carolina and are now either extinct or have moved to other locales. Among them are the wolf, buffalo, passenger pigeon, cougar, Carolina parakeet, elk, and beaver.
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Record #:
8656
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At least forty species of warblers either visit or nest in North Carolina; however, they are among the hardest birds to find and to identify. Warblers are all the same size and come in a confusing array of colors and share similar field marks and songs. Warbler watching can become easier; vegetation, climate, and geography are clues to the type of warbler to be found in a particular location. Some warblers are restricted to types of vegetation growth. Most of the warblers winter in the tropics. Lee discusses a number of warblers and locations for viewing them.
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Record #:
8015
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There are forty-one different kinds of fireflies living in North Carolina. In this country they are commonly called lightning bugs and in others they are glow-worms. These little creatures that twinkle through long summer nights are not flies, bugs, or worms at all but are small flying beetles. Lee relates interesting information about fireflies.
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Record #:
8
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Purple martins, the largest, highest-flying, and most popular of the swallow family, are rumored to be effective for controlling mosquitos.
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Record #:
681
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The ocean sunfish is one of the earth's largest and strangest creatures, and surely the only fish that sunbathes.
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Record #:
1066
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The alligator, now protected under the Endangered Species Act, has found a home in certain areas of North Carolina.
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Record #:
1343
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Three species of the woodland hawk call North Carolina home. Lee takes a look at their migratory and nesting activities in the state.
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