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5 results for Jones, Ora L
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Record #:
9925
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an effort to save Confederate forces under the command Gen. Braxton Bragg from defeat, Gen. James Longstreet moved 15,000 men of the Army of Northern Virginia, plus their artillery, ammunition, wagons, horses and mules from their home bases in Virginia to Chattanooga, Tennessee, a distance of more than 900 miles, in just nine days. Only a few weeks later, Federal forces under the command of Major General Joseph Hooker broke this record by moving more than 20,000 troops and their supplies 1,157 miles in five days on orders to relieve Gen. William Rosecrans who was under siege in Chattanooga at the hands of the recently reinforced Confederates. Both moves took place in September, 1863.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 8, Sept 1972, p12-13, 31, il
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Record #:
10612
Author(s):
Abstract:
The most successful Confederate spy, in terms of turning in the most important and vital military information, was probably Washington socialite Mrs. Rose O'Neal Greenhow. Wealthy, educated, and widowed, Mrs. Greenhow used her luxurious home as the center of Confederate espionage activities, apparently making little or no effort to hide her support of the South. Arousing the suspicion of Federal authorities, Mrs. Greenhow was shadowed by Allen Pinkerton and arrested by Union forces for espionage. Despite being sentenced to house arrest, Mrs. Greenhow continued her work for the Confederate cause, including a secret mission to Europe in 1862. Greenhow drowned on the return voyage in 1864 when her ship ran aground near Fort Fisher.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Aug 1970, p11, 28, il, por
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Record #:
10628
Author(s):
Abstract:
Prison overcrowding and the associated issues of housing, feeding, guarding, and caring for prisoners was a problem for both the North and the South during the Civil War. Relief came from a prisoner exchange agreement in July, 1862 that allowed for the exchange of prisoners within ten days of capture. President Jefferson Davis, CSA, broke this agreement over the issue of captured black soldiers and Major General Henry W. Halleck returned the favor in May 1863 by ordering that all prisoner exchanges were to be stopped. Afterwards, prison conditions on both sides deteriorated rapidly from overcrowding, leading to the deaths of more than 56,000 POWs during the war. The most notorious prisons were Andersonville (Confederate) and Fort Delaware (Union).
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 11, Nov 1970, p17-18, 24, il
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Record #:
10629
Author(s):
Abstract:
The greatest maritime disaster in the history of the United States up to that time occurred on April 27, 1865 at approximately 2 a.m. A total of 1,238 passengers, 1,806 just released from the Andersonville, GA prison camp, were lost when the newly commissioned Mississippi sidewheeler SULTANA exploded and sank near Memphis, TN. Because of recent news regarding the surrender of Robert E. Lee and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, little publicity was given to the event at the time and it has been largely forgotten since. Designed to carry no more than 1,500 persons, the boat was overloaded with a total of 2,054 passengers eager to return to the North following the war.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 11, Nov 1970, p18
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Record #:
10645
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shortly after the outbreak of the Civil War, various groups of lawbreakers populated the mountains of western North Carolina and east Tennessee. Outliers were men who were hiding in the forests to dodge conscription. As the war progressed, they were joined by groups of deserters from the army who sought to keep out of the clutches of army patrols. Deserters who returned home often became associated with other outlaws and began operating in groups known as bushwhackers. Bushwhackers would wear either Union or Confederate uniforms and raid local homes for food, clothing, livestock and other supplies.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 17, Feb 1971, p15-16, 31, il
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