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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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20 results for Jeter, Frank, Jr
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Record #:
31325
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fifty years ago, Hugh Hammond Bennett of Anson County began a movement that set a standard for erosion control practices and led to the creation of the United States Soil Conservation Service. Today, the nation has more than three-thousand soil conservation districts. This article provides background on Bennett and his conservation efforts.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 7, July 1985, p10-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31373
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thurman F. Nance of Lee County is known as the “admiral” of Jordan Lake, where he operates a lakeside boat rental service. Nance was active in efforts to develop the New Hope Dam and helped create the reservoir during the 1950s. Since the opening of Jordan Lake Rentals in 1982, Nance’s business has grown steadily into a year-round operation.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 16 Issue 11, Nov 1984, p10-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31381
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Herford County town of Murfreesboro was a center of Revolutionary War events. The history of Murfreesboro is marked year-round with tours of restored buildings, activities, and celebrations, such as the Historic Murfreesboro Heritage Festival and LaFayette Ball.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Jan 1983, p12-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31404
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many North Carolinians are concerned that proposals for granting offshore oil-drilling leases could lead to oil spills. During World War Two, oil spills along North Carolina’s shoreline were common since oil tankers were main targets by the German Navy U-boats. In the process, many tankers sank, leaving grave markers along the coast.
Record #:
31503
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina soil conservation specialists are currently involved in a project offering assistance, support, and encouragement to help farmers in Ecuador address that country’s severe soil erosion problems. Jesse L. Hicks and other soil conservationists went to Ecuador to make recommendations and initiate development of a national soil conservation program. Ecuadorians also came to North Carolina for specialized training.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p18-19, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31525
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park is home to business firms, government agencies, and modern research facilities, as well as 5,400 acres of landscaping. Since the beginning, the Triangle was planned as an attractive location with the assistance of soil conservationists. A careful landscape plan included conservation measures to prevent erosion and provide a scene of natural beauty.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 5, May 1980, p15, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31530
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mother Earth News is a widely read magazine on natural living, organic gardening, solar energy and other sustainable practices. The organization’s managers are developing an “Eco Village” for its headquarters in Hendersonville. The village will feature two solar greenhouses, a farm, camping sites, picnic areas, and nature trails.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 8, Aug 1980, p10, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31558
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina farmers are expected to harvest a record of 1.4 million Christmas trees for sale this season. Christmas trees grown in North Carolina consist primarily of four native species, which include Fraser fir, white pine, Virginia pine and Eastern red cedar. Trees are being produced as a “cut your own” practice on tree farms, as a conservation measure, and as an export to other states.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 11 Issue 12, Dec 1979, p6-7, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31570
Author(s):
Abstract:
While designed for flood prevention and other benefits, a watershed project can provide some unexpected beauty. The Bear Creek Watershed Project, which serves parts of Wayne, Greene and Lenoir Counties in eastern North Carolina, developed dams and a natural landscape to prevent erosion and flooding. The watershed also provides opportunities for bass fishing, nature enjoyment, and habitat for wildlife.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 8, Aug 1978, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31575
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bob Timberlake of Lexington, North Carolina is known for his beautiful paintings of America’s “good side.” His watercolor painting, “Daisies,” is the official painting for the 25th anniversary of the national Keep America Beautiful campaign. Timberlake is also working to raise money for student art scholarships and awards for paintings which promote natural beautification.
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Record #:
31583
Author(s):
Abstract:
The big granite quarry of Dickerson, Inc., in Richmond County is the eastern-most granite quarry in North Carolina. The 77-acre quarry is surrounded by a conservation plan aimed at environmental quality. Soil conservationists planted grass and vegetation areas to prevent erosion and protect the surrounding natural areas.
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Record #:
31592
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s environmental beach clinics started as an experiment by the Soil Conservation Service four years and continue to be successful. The purpose of the beach clinics was to promote the use of newly developed beach grasses and other vegetation to protect dunes and ocean-front property from eroding or washing away. Participants in the beach clinics learn about native vegetation, planting techniques, and coastal erosion.
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Record #:
31608
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dan Andrews of northern Harnett County has a substantial farm operation that has taken him down two separate routes of farming and forestry. Andrews grows soybeans, corn, tobacco and small grains on his farm, and manages one-thousand acres of timber for lumber. He also receives assistance in conservation practices from the Soil Conservation Service and the North Carolina Forest Service.
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Record #:
31624
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pick Shin Nature Center, located outside the town of Dobson in Surry County, was developed as a living monument to history as part of an experiment in environmental education. The center features a replica of an old school house, a genuine one-room country store, restored farm equipment, and a log house built and occupied in 1875. In honor of the United States Bicentennial, the center will offer special educational programs recreating farm scenes of the past.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Aug 1976, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31641
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Watauga County Farmers Market attracts hundreds of people who come to socialize, and buy local farm produce and handicrafts. The farmers market is operated on a non-profit basis and was developed in 1973 by the New River Valley Resource Conservation and Development Project. The market organization has eighty members selling their merchandise.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, Apr 1975, p20-21, por Periodical Website