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13 results for Jeffrey, Thomas E
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Record #:
16854
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Thomas Lanier Clingman (1812-1897) was a congressman and general before and during the Civil War who turned to the art of inventing following during his post-bellum career. Clingman became interested in electrical technology and began experimenting with a light bulb designs. Documentation of his invention can be found in patent records and a series of letters exchanged between Edison and Clingman between March and December of 1879. Obviously his zirconia lamp designs did not rival Edison's breakthroughs but he does rank with many other inventors of the era for advancing the area of electrical lighting.
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Record #:
16863
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The state's antebellum politics was divided between the Whig and Democratic parties. Scholars have long held that both parties could be considered progressive; first the Whigs in 1836 followed by a shift to Democrats in 1848 when they adopted a more progressive outlook. Dr. Jeffrey offers a new analysis of the state's antebellum politics and when the state's citizens truly got the progressive leadership they desired.
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Record #:
21216
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A look at Congressman Thomas Lanier Clingman's role in the transition of support away from the Whig party in the mid-1850s in North Carolina.
Record #:
21306
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An examination of the convention movement of the 1830s and at constitutional and suffrage reform revealing that party politics, which played a vital role in the movement, also proved to be an important factor behind the movement's failure a generation later.
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Record #:
21346
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During the Antebellum period in North Carolina, internal improvements for the state were impacted little by party affiliations in the state legislature. Year by year analyses of the state legislature during this period determined that sectionalism was much more important in determining the success of legislation. These analyses demonstrate how difficult it was for multisectional parties to address sectional issues such as internal improvements.
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Record #:
21401
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During the rise of Democrats over Whigs between 1848 and 1850, the possibility that free suffrage might have been repealed, has been deemed by historians to not have been a significant factor. It is has been understood that David S. Reid, Democratic gubernatorial candidate, and William W. Holden, editor on the 'North Carolina Standard,' were able to lure Whigs who opposed free suffrage to the Democratic cause. In actuality, reform issues divided eastern and western Whigs who differed on the free suffrage issue. Holden also used his newspaper to slant Whig perception toward free suffrage in the 1848 and 1850 elections.
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Record #:
21461
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The first in a series of articles examining the mid-1850s dispute between Congressman Thomas Lanier Clingman and Professor of Sciences at the University of North Carolina, Elisha Mitchell, over who had been the first to identify, ascend, and measure the highest peak in the Black Mountains in Yancey County. The debate took a tragic turn when, in June 1857, Mitchell returned to the Mountains to vindicate his claim and lost his footing and fell to his death.
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Record #:
21470
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The second in a series of articles examining the mid-1850s dispute between Congressman Thomas Lanier Clingman and Professor of Sciences at the University of North Carolina Elisha Mitchell over who had been the first to identify, ascend, and measure the highest peak in the Black Mountains in Yancey County. The debate took a tragic turn when, in June 1857, Mitchell returned to the mountains to vindicate his claim and lost his footing and fell to his death.
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Record #:
21526
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In 1835, the North Carolina state legislature revised the state constitution to abolish the county basis for legislative representation. This allowed the legislature to review petitions for the formation of new counties without having to increase the number of General Assembly seats. Through this legislation, several new western counties were created, but by the 1850s this had stopped because of fears the sectional balance of the state would be disrupted.
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Record #:
21529
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With the continued issue of county division politics in antebellum North Carolina, many voters abandoned their party when candidates took a stand to which they were opposed. Concurrently, a politician seized on this disunion by casting aspersion on opponents, allowing for many political upsets. This allow expands on the history of county divisions by providing insight into how grassroots issues can alter political structures.
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North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 65 Issue 4, Oct 1988, p468-491 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
21532
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This article examines the personal letters between Calvin Henderson Wiley, North Carolina's first superintendent of public schools and politician John Wilson Cuningham. These letters tell scholars how public events in North Carolina were perceived through the eyes of these two prominent citizens.
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Record #:
21538
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An examination of the post-Civil War political activities of North Carolina Congressman and Senator, Thomas Lanier Clingman, which provides a look into the issues, power struggles, and personalities of North Carolina politics during the first two decades after the Civil War. Particular attention is given to Clingman's involvement in the \"railroad ring\" fraud orchestrated by George W. Swepson and Milton S. Littlefield, in which Swepson invested $843,633 dollars of state appropriated bond sales proceeds meant for use in expansion of state railroads into three Florida railroads for personal profits, aided by Littlefield's bribery and manipulation of legislators. Clingman's role as Swepson's attorney put him in the thick of the controversy and prevented a resurgence of his political career.
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Record #:
3173
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Abstract:
Disagreement over legislative seat apportionment, the prohibition of persons of various religious faiths from holding office, and other factors led to a call in 1835 for a convention to revise the 1776 state constitution.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p10-13, il, por