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49 results for Hicklin, J. B
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Record #:
15031
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Abstract:
When construction gangs were attempting to complete the pass for the first train tracks on both sides of the Blue Ridge Mountains, the western side had more difficulty due to lack of locomotives to help the work progress. It took eight yoke of oxen to get a locomotive to the western side of the divide. The job was done in two weeks and the railroad complete shortly after.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 2, June 1940, p9
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Record #:
15049
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Abstract:
There was a gold rush in North Carolina during the early 19th-century, and the state also had its own privately owned mint run by Christopher Bechtler and recognized by the Federal Government.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 12, Aug 1940, p8-9
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Record #:
15065
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October marks the beginning of bear hunting season for the western forests of North Carolina. Much of the best bear hunting grounds in the southern Appalachians have been incorporated into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and has become a game refuge.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 22, Oct 1940, p1-2, 24-25, f
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Record #:
15074
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Names that brighten the pages of North Carolina history are to be found on the roll of law students who attended classes in a one-room, mud-daubed log cabin several miles up the headwaters of the north fork of Swannanoa River, northeast of Asheville. Such was the reputation of this school, conducted by Judge John Lancaster Bailey of Pasquotank County, that students were outstanding in their communities. Among those who gained places of public prominence from Judge Bailey's Law School were William Bailey, J. K. Connally, Washington Hardy, Thomas Johnson, and one woman student, Grace Hallyburton.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 29, Dec 1940, p7
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Record #:
15071
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The largest arrowhead in the world is one of the things which distinguishes Old Fort, in McDowell County from other western North Carolina communities. From 1756 to 1776 Old Fort was the westernmost outpost of the white settlers in the frontier. The arrowhead monument was dedicated to the memory of the gallant band of men who braved the dangers to establish this frontier outpost.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 27, Nov 1940, p5, 22, f
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Record #:
15084
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Abstract:
Two monuments were erected in Graham County to honor Junaluska, Native American chief during the 18th century. He aided General Andrew Jackson's forces in the battle with Creek Indians and was credited with saving Jackson's life during the Battle of Horsehoe Bend. Neither of Junaluska's efforts solidified Jackson's allegiance and Jackson ordered a militia to remove the Cherokee from the mountains. The Mexican War slowed these efforts and Junaluska along with his Cherokee tribesmen remained in the Smoky Mountains.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 8, July 1941, p7, 18, il
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Record #:
15096
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Abstract:
In the early 1940s, four dams were planned for the state with a fifth waiting approval. The dams were expected to increase power in times of war and peace. Nantahala Power and Light Company were responsible for constructing the Glenville dam on Tuckasegee River in Jackson County and Nantahala dam in Macon County. The Tennessee Valley Authority constructed two dams on the Hiawassee River. The first was the Appalachia dam built below the existing Hiwassee dam and the second, Chatuge dam, four miles east of Hayesville in Clay County. Combined cost for the four structures cost about $100,000,000.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 19, Oct 1941, p12, 25, il
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Record #:
15100
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A long deferred honor may be paid to Colonel William Holland Thomas, said to have been the only white man to ever become a full-fledged Indian chief of the eastern band of the Cherokees. He was a recognized pioneer road-builder in what is now the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. There is a plan to have one of the new scenic highways in the park designated \"Little Wil\" Thomas or Wil-Usdi Highway as a monument to his memory.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 32, Jan 1941, p5, 21, f
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Record #:
15107
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Abstract:
Bushwhackers, such as Bill Kirk's Raiders, spread a reign of terror through western North Carolina during the American Civil War. Ruthless and lawless bands would plunder, burn, and murder at random over the unprotected mountains. They became such a menace and serious threat to Confederate troops that detachments were sent to deal with the situation finally forcing them to yield to law and order.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 35, Jan 1941, p1, 17, f
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Record #:
15124
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Craggy Gardens, said to be the largest and loftiest flower gardens in the world, are to become predominant background for western North Carolina future rhododendron festivals. Craggy Gardens is semi-public property, belonging to the United States government and the city of Asheville. While Craggy Gardens have been a mecca for many years for hardy beauty lovers who could scale the deep heights of Craggy Dome, it was not until 1933 that a motor road to the crest allowed more visitors to enjoy the flowers and the view.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 42, Mar 1941, p1, 21
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Record #:
15116
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Lulu Belle and Skyland Scotty, also known as Mr. and Mrs. Scott Wiseman, are headline radio artists who hail from Western North Carolina. They have achieved considerable fame through the presentation of native mountain songs on the radio.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 37, Feb 1941, p8, 24, f
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Record #:
15123
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Black Mountain College, founded by Rollins College staff after dissension over teaching methods, is probably the most unusual college in North Carolina. At the present time, workmen engaged in completing Black Mountain's new plant at Lake Eden include faculty members and students.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 41, Mar 1941, p9, 16
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Record #:
15131
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Abstract:
An ironic twist of fate has transformed the towering skeleton of a million dollar hotel on Jump-off Mountain near Hendersonville, North Carolina into a school building. Following the western North Carolina bonanza days of 1924-25, the half completed 13-story Fleetwood Hotel stood a constant reminder of a vanished dream. Four years ago a group of men pushed to the mountain top and began dismantling the structure, using pieces for new buildings for the Pisgah Institute, west of Asheville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 45, Apr 1941, p27
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Record #:
15172
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John W. Squires reported an increase of nabbing poachers in Pisgah National Forest. Poachers used spotlights to blind and confuse wildlife then proceed to hunt. One species in danger was the Virginia white-tail deer, an animal stocked by George W. Vanderbilt around his Biltmore Estate and later partially incorporated into Pisgah National Forest. Numbers of poachers apprehended from November 1937 to May 1, 1938 totaled twenty in the Pisgah Game Preserve and an additional twenty-two in Sherwood State Refuge. The solution was to place additional wardens armed with flashlights and revolvers at strategic points throughout the preserve.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 1, June 1938, p1, 18, il
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Record #:
15174
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Abstract:
With the development of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park the government was left with a dilemma of displacing people from their homesteads. Some residents left willingly but others less inclined to leave were granted a leasing option. Leases were short term but renewable and extended to the \"lifetime of persons now living within the park area.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 2, June 1938, p5, 7, il
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