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31 results for Green, Philip P, Jr
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Record #:
525
Abstract:
Albert Coates is the founder of the Institute of Government at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and he remains active in the program.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 54 Issue 4, Spring 1989, p2-8, il, por, bibl, f
Record #:
17449
Abstract:
The 17th decennial census beginning in April 1950 will be the biggest counting operation in United States history. It is particular importance to North Carolina as it has been predicted that the state ill lose one of its twelve representatives, and thus one of its votes in the Electoral College.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Nov 1949, p6-8, 12-13
Record #:
17452
Abstract:
North Carolina cities as a group stand above the average of comparable cities over the country in almost every aspect of city planning activity.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Dec 1949, p8-9
Subject(s):
Record #:
17458
Abstract:
A spotlight was placed on what firemen consider the most pressing problem in North Carolina's fire protection of today: how to provide adequate protection for the rural areas of the state.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 16 Issue 5, Feb 1950, p6-9
Record #:
17512
Abstract:
After recognition of the problem in 1893, numerous amendments, and studies, and a troubled beginning with the 1949 General Assembly, the Stream Pollution Bill finally passed in the House in 1951, reshaped to meet previous objections.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 17 Issue 7, Mar 1951, p7-8, 16
Record #:
17526
Abstract:
North Carolina's city planning agencies, which have sometimes felt handicapped by lack of sufficient legal authority, received new tools of major importance from the 1951 General Assembly. Foremost among these was the Urban Redevelopment Law, while significant measures relating to streets, parking, recreation, and zoning were also enacted.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 17 Issue 9, May 1951, p13-16
Record #:
17527
Abstract:
Firemen and others seeking an answer to the rural fire protection problem were given a new tool by the 1951 General Assembly. Rural fire protection districts may now be created in any county of North Carolina.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 17 Issue 10 , June 1951, p11, 13
Record #:
17556
Abstract:
Fourteen counties took the initiative to form city-county planning commissions regulate growth and development. County planning was considered so important to regulate legislation, revenue, and taxes between urban, suburban, and rural areas of each county. The previous two session of the General Assembly granted more of these powers to county officials whom tried to work with local civic groups for the betterment of state counties.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 26 Issue 6-7, Mar-Apr 1960, p2-4, 23, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17600
Abstract:
A remarkable burst of activity in the fields of city planning and zoning has taken place in North Carolina cities and towns since World War II. Various city planning and zone boards and commissions are providing a wide variety of programs and activities to improve city development.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Sept 1952, p10-11
Subject(s):
Record #:
17653
Abstract:
Two recent decisions by the North Carolina Supreme Court have focused attention on a growing problem faced by municipal administration: the proper location of water storage tanks. Quite commonly, good engineering practice dictates the location of such facilities. But legal, financial, social, or political problems related to this location may force the city to choose another spot.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 19 Issue 7, Mar 1953, p9-10, Inside back cover
Record #:
17654
Abstract:
Newspaper accounts in recent months have heralded the establishment of a new feature on the North Carolina municipal scene: the capital expenditures budget. Because this represents a significant step in the movement toward more business like procedures in municipal government, Green examines how the cities and towns use this budge to efficiently prepare and schedule for improvements and developments.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 19 Issue 8, Apr 1953, p5-8, il, bibl
Record #:
17650
Abstract:
A section of the North Carolina General Assembly provides that every city and town in the state is authorized to create a Planning Board whose duty it is to study the resources, needs, conditions, and possibilities of municipality development.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 19 Issue 6, Feb 1953, p7-8
Subject(s):
Record #:
17663
Abstract:
With the exception of new efforts to solve the rural fire protection problem and a wave of bills granting exemptions from jury duty to volunteer firemen, the 1953 North Carolina General Assembly made few changes in the existing pattern of fire protection legislation.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 19 Issue 10, June 1953, p9-10
Record #:
17662
Abstract:
The 1953 North Carolina General Assembly added a number of new legal weapons to the armory available for use by local governmental officials in planning and development of their cities and counties.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 19 Issue 10, June 1953, p6-8, 12
Record #:
17669
Abstract:
One of the central problems facing a growing North Carolina is what to do with the urban fringe. Green summarizes the most effective methods for dealing with development on the city limits.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Oct 1953, p7-9