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3 results for Gates, Nancy G
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Record #:
8211
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wildacres Retreat is a fourteen-hundred-acre forestland sitting atop Pompey's Knob beside the Blue Ridge Parkway. I. D. (Dick) Blumenthal of Charlotte bought the land in 1936 for only $6,500. The original owner, Thomas Dixon, famous for his racist novel “The Clansmen,” wanted the site to be a colony of artists and scientists. When Blumenthal acquired the property, he began inviting interfaith religious groups to Wildacres Lodge in an effort to quash the property's racist beginnings. He invited different groups and societies each week and established camps for musicians and artists to come and appreciate the solitude and beauty of the area. Wildacres hosts over three thousand participants a year. Blumenthal died in 1978 and is buried alongside his wife at the summit of the mountain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p16-18, por
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Record #:
8402
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Sternberger House was built in Greensboro by Sigmund Sternberger. The house, built in 1926, is considered an outstanding example of Venetian renaissance revival architecture. Located on Summit Avenue, the home is now surrounded by parking lots and highways. Sternberger donated the home to the United Arts Council in Greensboro. After his death in 1963, the council used the home as their home office. Since 1979, rooms in the home have been rented to painters, potters, and writers to provide them with a location to create their works. Several of the home's artists, such as Peter Agostini, have work that is found in such places as the Metropolitan and Museum of Modern Art.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p14, por
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Record #:
8658
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Foreign Language Center was born in 1975. It is now housed at the Gillespie Street Branch Library in Fayetteville. The center was created through the Library Services and Construction Act, which mandated that certain funds to go toward materials for non-native English speakers. At the time, libraries throughout the state held some materials for non-native English speakers; however, the collections tended to be small and focused on particular groups. Marian Leath, then Assistant State Librarian, and David Warren, Director of Cumberland County Library, wrote the grant proposal for the North Carolina Foreign Language Center. The center now houses over 20,400 books and 2,000 tapes in over seventy languages. Materials are available to libraries throughout the state and nation through interlibrary loan. Cost in the interlibrary loan process has caused difficulties for the language center, but no other effective means of getting the materials to patrons has been found.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 5, Oct 1983, p11-12, por
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