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5 results for Fonvielle, Chris E
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Record #:
3999
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Abstract:
Built in 1862, Fort Anderson was the last fortification against Union troops moving up the Cape Fear River to attack Wilmington. It fell to Union soldiers on February 17, 1865, leading to the capture of Wilmington and effectively shutting off the Confederacy's last supply line.
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Record #:
21795
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Abstract:
This article examines the contributions of Louis Froelich as an arms supplier to the Confederacy during the Civil War. Froelich operated two arms factories that contracted edged weaponry, sheathes, and buttons to the Confederate military.
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Record #:
24803
Author(s):
Abstract:
Prisoner exchanges were a common part of military strategy during the Civil War. In 1864, Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant halted prisoner exchanges in an attempt to subdue the South, but in 1865, allowed prisoner transactions to resume. Wilmington, North Carolina was chosen as the site to release Union prisoners. History professor and author, Chris Fonvielle, addresses a number of questions about this exchange, including why Wilmington was chosen site and what the North Carolina public and political response was to the prisoner exchange.
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Record #:
28787
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Abstract:
The burning of the British Fort Johnston by Patriot militia on July 19, 1775 is largely overlooked by historians of the American Revolution in the South. This incident is where the first shots of the American Revolution in North Carolina occurred, not at the battle of Moores Creek Bridge on February 27, 1776. This was an act of sabotage against property owned by King George III and of rebellion against the king of England. This event stopped Gov. Josiah Martin from changing his seat of government, a planned southern military campaign, and marked the end of the royal government in North Carolina.
Record #:
34624
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite the Union’s control of the Outer Banks early in the war, Wilmington remained a Confederate port through 1864. Engineers had built a series of forts, batteries, and fieldworks around the city which aided in continued Confederate occupation. These obstacles were built to protect both the rail lines into the city and Wilmington’s port facilities—the preferred harbor for blockade runners due to its dual access. Following a failed Union expedition to capture Fort Fisher in 1864, Union forces successfully stormed the fort in 1865 and took the port of Wilmington soon after. The port’s capture precipitated later victories at Fayetteville and Goldsboro and brought an end to Confederate rebellion in North Carolina.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Winter 2000, p26-36, il, por