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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Elliott, Doug
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Record #:
9967
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Having a distinctive black mask over its eyes and a long, bushy tail with black rings, the raccoon is easily recognizable. The animal is known for its curiosity and playfulness, in addition to a sensitive nose, keen eyesight, and hearing.
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Record #:
9558
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Ginseng, harvested in North Carolina since Colonial days, is a profitable product for residents of the state's western mountains. The plant is not valued for its leaves or crimson berries, but for its tuberous root. In the Far East it is valued as a medicinal herb, and almost all ginseng harvested is shipped to Hong Kong. Elliott discusses the history of the plant in North Carolina, the state's ginseng program, and several state laws that govern its collection and sale.
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Record #:
6047
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The shrew, the only venomous mammal in this hemisphere, is one of the most common mammals in the state. However, few people have ever seen one. The shorttail shrew is the largest in the state, measuring around three or four inches and rarely weighing over four-fifths of an ounce. The shrew is a ravenous creature and needs to eat twice its own weight in 24 hours.
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Record #:
6052
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To many people, orchid means an exotic plant blooming in a far-off jungle or in a horticultural hothouse. However, orchids do exist closer to home. There are around 170 species in North America, and one-fourth of that number can be found within the state's borders. Elliott describes a number of species, including Pink Lady's Slipper, Snowy Orchid, and the Crane Fly Orchid. Orchids are found in every county in the state.
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Record #:
711
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Soaring up to two hundred feet, the tulip poplar is North Carolina's largest tree. Settlers used its timber for cabins, its bark for siding, and collected honey from its handsome blossom.
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Record #:
9972
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While they are not beautiful birds and people cringe at their eating habits, vultures are capable of astounding feats of flying and also perform a useful service. They serve as nature's sanitation department by disposing of dead animals and plants.
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Record #:
9973
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Sixteen species of bats have been recorded in the state. Several are relatively rare and three--Townsend's big-eared bat, the Indiana bat, and the gray bat--are endangered.
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Record #:
1947
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Black gum trees are a valuable source of food and shelter for North Carolina Wildlife, and they provide many practical benefits to rural families.
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Record #:
13866
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Swallowtails are North Carolina's largest butterflies, and seven species live within the state. They are the pipevine, tiger, spicebush, black, zebra, palamedes, and the giant swallowtail. Swallowtails inhabit all regions of the state.
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Record #:
28437
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Doug Elliott, author and naturalist, reminisces about taking his son deer hunting in North Carolina. He taught his son how to scout for deer, find a good place to make a deer stand, and show respect for the animal they were hunting.