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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Durden, Robert F
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Record #:
5940
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James B. Duke is a well-known name in the history of the North Carolina tobacco industry, but not many people know of his involvement with electricity. Durden recounts a less known but very risky venture in building what was, at that time, the world's largest hydrostation. The project was built in a remote Canadian region.
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Record #:
20871
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This article looks at the successful suit in the United States Supreme Court against the State of North Carolina by the State of South Dakota over the matter of state-issued bonds. In particular, the author tracks the fault for the bond issues to Governor Daniel L. Russell and his administration.
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Record #:
21094
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The Reed Gold Mine in Cabarrus County was, in 1799, the site of the first authenticated discovery of Gold in the United States. North Carolina produced more gold than any other state prior to 1849, and was the source for all native gold coined by the federal mint until 1828. Details on John Reed, the owner of the Reed Gold Mine, are included.
Record #:
21093
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This article looks at the tricky legal backlash that resulted from a complex bequest left in the last will and testament of North Carolina industrialist James B. Duke.
Record #:
21102
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In 1890, Washington Duke financed Trinity College's move from Randolph County to Durham. When the college fell into financial difficulty in 1892, Duke's son, Benjamin N. Duke, interceded with financial support. He and his brother, James B. Duke, invested their time and money into the university and established the Duke Endowment, used partly to build the new Duke University.
Record #:
21318
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Between 1899 and 1904, Durham native Edward James Parrish lived in Japan as a representative for James B. Duke's American Tobacco Company. Parrish worked closely with the Murai Brothers Company Ltd., to improve production, financing, and marketing techniques for the tobacco company. In 1904, the Japanese Diet introduced and passed legislation that began government ownership of all tobacco manufacturing, Parrish was influential in the company receiving a good settlement with the government.
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Record #:
21336
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Part one of a two-part article examining the founding of Duke University in the 1920's and its early years under President William Preston Few, focusing on Few's success in establishing a strong structure of government in the university that set competing interests in balance.
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Record #:
21357
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Part two of a two-part article examining the founding of Duke University in the 1920s and its early years under President William Preston Few, focusing on Few's success in establishing a strong structure of government in the university that set competing interests in balance.
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Record #:
21384
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Part one of a two-part article looking at the founding and fledgling years of the Law School at Duke University, the establishment of which was a result of the transition from Trinity College afforded by the establishment of the Duke Endowment in December of 1924. Particular attention is given to University President William Preston Few's search for a satisfactory dean and faculty for the law school, a process that took over five years to complete.
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Record #:
21391
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Part two of a two-part article looking at the founding and fledgling years of the Law School at Duke University, the establishment of which was a result of the transition from Trinity College afforded by the establishment of the Duke Endowment in December of 1924. Particular attention is given to University President William Preston Few's search for a satisfactory dean and faculty for the law school, a process that took over five years to complete.
Record #:
21518
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A look at the evolution of the Duke Endowment, created by James B. Duke in 1924, as it has succeeded in maintaining its founder's concern for education and health care despite the termination of its relationship with the Duke Power Company. In the early 1970s, the endowment's board wanted to sell its stock in Duke Power and diversify its portfolio, however the resistance of Doris Duke and a revival of utility stocks in the 1980s tabled those plans until after her death in 1993. The trustees have managed the endowment creatively and in accordance with the philanthropic intention of its founder, but James Duke's plan for \"perpetual philanthropy\" funded by Duke Power Company dividends has ended.
Record #:
21528
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In 1937, William Hayes Ackland approached Duke University and offered to endow an art museum. To receive the endowment, Ackland stipulated that his body, preserved in a sarcophagus must be kept in the museum. This requirement was received by Duke president William P. Few, who negotiated the agreement with Ackland. After both Few and Ackland died in 1940, Duke Trustees decided to back out of the agreement, to the dismay of prominent alumni. As a result of that decision the generous endowment with to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill instead.
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North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 65 Issue 4, Oct 1988, p445-468 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
21601
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This article examines the ending and the fallout of the three year struggle at Duke University between President Arthur Hollis Edens and Vice-President of Education Paul Gross. Gross and his allies on the Duke Endowment Fund forced Edens to resign in 1960 after he refused to accept an appointment as chancellor. Gross had previously campaigned against Edens by stating he opposed plans to make Duke a top national school which angered trustees who forced Edens from his post. This situation led to reforms at Duke University that clarified administrative positions and authority, and included the creation of a university provost position.
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Record #:
21598
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The first in a series of articles examining of the formative years of industrial electric supply systems, specifically the Southern Power Company that would become the Duke Power Company in 1924. The Duke company differed from most other investor-owned utilities in that the power was generated from a single system, it was financially autonomous thanks to the large investment of capital from the Duke brothers, plants and dams were designed and built by in-house engineers, the dams provided conservation benefits long before such things were mandated or tax funded, and Duke power became a national leader in its field by pioneering with numerous technologies.
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Record #:
21596
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This article examines the administration of Arthur Hollis Edens as president of Duke University from 1949 to 1959. It also looks at his relationship with Paul M. Gross, vice president of Duke's Division of Education. Conflict between the two developed over control of specific aspects of fundraising and the allocation of those funds at the university. While the conflict between the two began in 1956, it wasn't until early 1960 that those disagreements became public.
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