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17 results for Dean, G.E
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Record #:
13948
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Abstract:
The Culpepper Rebellion, which took place near Elizabeth City, left North Carolina without any state government at all for more than two years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 15, Sept 1950, p11, 18
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Record #:
14086
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Ninety year old Marcia Albertson began an early enterprise as a traveling kitchen specialist in 1948. Her expertise was in canning and home preserving of foodstuffs, which she decided to share with communities in northeastern North Carolina. Traveling by buggy, Miss Marcia educated North Carolina youth on canning and preserving fruits and vegetables. Also along her travels, she \"organized canning clubs throughout Pasquotank County's 223 square miles.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 5, July 1948, p6, il
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Record #:
14079
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An Elizabeth City newspaper called The Independent was a respected both within North Carolina and nationally. The article focuses on the newspaper and it's editor, W.O. Saunders, impact on the community. His antics gained him a certain amount of infamy as well as his hard work on The Independent.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 2, June 1948, p10
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Record #:
15046
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Abstract:
The final curtain will soon be rung on the long and interesting career of the big, old-fashioned playhouse the James Adams Floating Theatre, on board which many thousands of river town audiences in three states have laughed and cried. The Theatre will be beached on the banks of the West River south of Annapolis, MD, as the close of the season and converted into a moving picture house.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 9, July 1940, p1, 18, f
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Record #:
15057
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Abstract:
One of the worst wrecks ever to occur off the coast of North Carolina gave Coast Guardsmen stationed at Kill Devil Hills, Kitty Hawk, and Nag's Head stations an opportunity to effect one of the most thrilling rescues of human life in the history of the service. The ship, Paraguay, enroute from Spain to New York City, ran aground in strong winds between Kitty Hawk and Kill Devil Hills, but Coast Guardsmen rescued twenty-four of the Greek seamen aboard the vessel.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 18, Sept 1940, p9, f
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Record #:
15061
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the most valuable beacons on the Atlantic coast stands on Bodie Island, below Nag's Head, on the waters of Oregon Inlet. Bodie Island light fills a dangerous gap between Cape Henry, Virginia and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, and holds the distinction of standing on the first tract of beach property sold in Dare County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 19, Oct 1940, p7, f
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Record #:
15058
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Abstract:
Diamond Shoals Lightship, which swings at anchor in 180 fathoms of water 14 miles at sea off Cape Hatteras, was the only American light vessel sent to the bottom of the Atlantic by German underseas craft during the First World War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 18, Sept 1940, p13, 24, f
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Record #:
15069
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Abstract:
Whale's Head Light, or Currituck Beach Lighthouse, stands 163 feet high on the beach at Corolla, North Carolina. Built in 1875, it fills a dangerous gap between Cape Henry, Virginia and Bodie Island where southbound vessels keep inshore to avoid the Gulf Stream.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 25, Nov 1940, p9, f
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Record #:
15323
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The Metropolis wrecked off the Currituck Lighthouse on December 29, 1877. The two-mast steamer carried 246 passengers and 102 perished in the wreck. Aboard the ship were supplies to build a railroad in Brazil. A terrible storm drove the ship onto shore not far from Currituck Lighthouse.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 18, Oct 1937, p3, 22, il
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Record #:
15327
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Abstract:
Saint Thomas Church in Bath is the oldest church in the state. The building remained in almost continuous use from its opening in 1734. Restoration costs were estimated to reach $50,000. Mrs. Marion Butler led the cause for its restoration and pushed for national recognition.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 20, Oct 1937, p7, il
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Record #:
15342
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Abstract:
Walter Abner Gibbs endeavored to make a fortune by breeding, raising, and skinning muskrats. He purchased 3,000 acres of marshes along the Currituck County coast to expand his pelt business which already included a 700 acre farm in Maryland. Muskrat pelts used to make Hudson Seal fur coats brought $2 a pelt in 1938.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 32, Jan 1938, p1, 16, il
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Record #:
15406
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Abstract:
Carrying comedy, romance, and high adventure to river town in five states is the unique business of the James Adams Floating Theatre of Elizabeth City now the only show boat east of the Mississippi River. The playhouse is now on its 23rd annual tour of the inland waters along the Atlantic seaboard between Wilmington, North Carolina and Wilmington, Delaware.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 8, July 1936, p5, 22, f
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Record #:
15421
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Once the despair of many a Federal prohibition agent, East Lake, a little swamp-hidden village of perhaps 250 souls on the Dare County mainland, has had hard sledding since the Volstead Act and the Eighteenth Amendment went by the boards. East Lake, the unofficial capital of booze making back in the Dry Era lay its chief claim to glory on a potent variety of ardent spirits known far and wide as \"East Lake Dew\" and marketed in quart bottles bearing imported labels.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 20, Oct 1936, p3, 18, f
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Record #:
15470
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Down at Manteo, things are already in place in anticipation of the entertainment of at least 50,000 visitors this summer for the 350th anniversary celebration of the landing of Sir Walter Raleigh's first English colonists. The celebration will be staged in August to welcome President Roosevelt as well.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 49, May 1937, p1, 21, f
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Record #:
15534
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dean recounts the life and accomplishments of J. W. Cannon, who started his first cotton mill in 1888 in Kannapolis. It has grown into one of the largest textile industries in the South.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 51, May 1935, p3, 20, por
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