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10 results for Davis, Chester S
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Record #:
10389
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The recently opened North Carolina School of Arts prepares for a very bright future. The school was created by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1963 (encouraged by Governor Terry Sanford). The assembly placed the school at Winston-Salem and given funding to construct the buildings in two years. The school has received ample funding from the state, the Ford Foundation, and has planned for a future fund raising goal of 7 million.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 9, Oct 1966, p8-9, 25, il
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Record #:
11872
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Indian troubles obliged Moravians in North Carolina to live close to each other in a village for mutual protection, continuing a communal economy far longer than at first intended. Overcrowded by refugees, the original settlement in Bethabara expanded to a second location in the Black Walnut Bottoms. In 1749, the British Parliament specifically recognized the Moravians as an honorable Episcopal Church, allowing them to continue their lives within the framework of the Anglican Church.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 3, July 1961, p18-20
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Record #:
11876
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At the end of 1776, Bethabara and Bethania housed a large portion of the Moravian brethren, with Salem set to stand as the new community by 1773. The new town became the center of the Wachovia settlement, attracting professional men such as a doctor, apothecary, and surveyor. Salem soon became a craft and manufacturing center, offering a full slate of services including weaving, tanning, and distilling. Salem was founded on the Moravian principle of oecononie, whereby the means of production were owned by the community, and the goods they produced were shared in kind
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p8
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Record #:
11905
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Poor river conditions exacerbated by variable water levels and numerous obstructions presented navigation problems on the inland waterways in North Carolina. In an attempt to improve these conditions as well as other issues inhibiting statewide progress, Judge and soon to be Governor, Archibald Debow Murphy, initiated internal advancements within the state and included river maintenance into his plan. In 1819, an internal improvement board was created and money was spent on clearing and dredging the rivers, making them navigable for watercraft. In 1825, the first Yadkin Navigation Company was created and $84,000 was spent on developing the Yadkin for commerce. By 1850, a second Yadkin River Navigation Company began, continuing advancements in the waterway. River improvements lead to an increase in water traffic, specifically in the form of steamboats. The onset of the Civil War slowed progress and by the time the war had ended, the newly implemented railroad offered a superior form of transportation.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 9, Sept 1963, p13, 24, il
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Record #:
11946
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For North Carolinians, the miracle of the first flight is that it somehow occurred in this state. Wilbur and Orville Wright needed a place where their wings could be spread wide and where the winds would lift those wings into soaring flight. After consulting with weather stations, and Kitty Hawk postmaster Captain William J. Tate, North Carolina became the chosen spot for their first flight.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p19-21, por
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Record #:
12179
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Thirty years ago, fishing was good in North Carolina, but the catch was small sized and no foundation existed for a sport fishery capable of attracting sportsmen from other areas. A few dreamers speculated on the possibilities of sport fishing far off-shore. Late in the 1920s a few adventurous souls pushed beyond the eastern horizons in small commercial fishing boats, catching large sailfish and other species, eventually proving that North Carolina is a haven for sport fishermen.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 6, Aug 1958, p7-9, por
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Record #:
12203
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Filling a void during the absence of professional musicians in North Carolina, the Moravians have shared and emanated their love of music through several centuries. Brought to the New Word during the period of settlement, the Moravians utilized the organ, piano, harpsichord, clavichord, harp, fiboline, cello, and viola, to glorify god and express their religious sentiments.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 9, Sept 1957, p9-10, 24, il
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Record #:
6673
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An overabundance of stray dogs, too many foxes, and too many unvaccinated pets have combined in Alleghany County to threaten not only wildlife but people and livestock as well. Rabies cropped up in the county early in 1952. Davis discusses how rabies strikes and the outbreak in Alleghany County.
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Record #:
6672
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The Moravians arrived in the Yadkin Valley in 1753. Davis discusses the use they made of the forest there. Hickory provided fine firewood and food from the nuts. Yellow poplar gave them boards for their buildings. The chestnut could also be used as a substitute for coffee. Before an apothecary shop was built, drugs came from the forest floor and included snake root as an antidote for venom and carpenter leaf for fresh wounds.
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Record #:
8316
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North Carolina's estuarine region covers two million acres. Only Alaska and Louisiana have more extensive estuarine areas than North Carolina, and no state is destroying the productivity of its estuaries as rapidly as this state. In the past fifteen years, almost one-third of the state's prime coastal marshlands have been destroyed. Davis discusses why this area is important to the state's economy, how development is affecting it, and possible approaches to saving the area.
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