NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Davis, Chester A
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
11869
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Moravians had to temper their pacifism with some dependence on force concerning the native Indians in the western part of the state. The worst of the troubles came during the French and Indian Wars as the Cherokees \"sold\" their land in the Treaty of Sycamore Shoals from 1754-1770. Fighting in the Northern colonies drove many Moravians into the Carolinas, particularly Bethabara, and after 1779, Bethania. Despite their scruples against bearing arms, the Moravians established a militia headed by Brother Jacob Loesch.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 2, June 1961, p11-12, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12645
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Moravians, among the first to settle in the western Piedmont, recorded their observations concerning the proliferation of game animals. Buffalo, black bear, wolves, and even panthers were observed, with elk and deer common throughout the area. Not accomplished hunters, the Moravians relied on the professional or \"long hunters\" of the frontier, while sharpening their own skills. Moravian records also reflect a consistent lack of game for hunting during the years 1752 through 1756.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 1, June 1961, p13-14, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12692
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Moravians carried their distinctive traditions into the 19th century, founding a mission for the Cherokee Indians, as well as a Female Mission Society to work closely among slaves. Although their traditions continued, changes occurred including the possession of slaves, and the annex of Wachovia lands into the county seat of Forsyth. This last change touched off an uproar in Salem, bringing the brethren into close contact with progressive influences.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept 1961, p31-32, por
Full Text:
Record #:
12847
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lord Granville, wealthy land owner in the North Carolina Colony, attempted to augment the population of the region by recruiting Moravian settlers. In response, August Gottlieb Spangenberg, also known as Brother Joseph, departed Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, on 25 August 1752, accompanied by five men, in search of a new settlement area in North Carolina. Returning to Bethlehem on 2 February 1753, Spangenberg was successful, having located an unclaimed tract of land encompassing approximately 100,000 acres, outside of Muddy Creek.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 21, Mar 1961, p15-16, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12915
Author(s):
Abstract:
Arriving in the Yadkin Valley in fall 1753, the Moravians utilized a variety of local tree resources for food, tools, fuel, and buildings. Some of these species include poplar, hickory, walnut, chestnut, ash, oak, beech, and pine.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 26, May 1961, p14
Full Text: