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10 results for Crow, Jeffrey J
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Record #:
15975
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Abstract:
Expansion of the museum surrounding the CSS Neuse offered the opportunity to reevaluate and reinterpret the State's role in the Civil War. The facilities new focus will shift from sole attention from remains of the Neuse to a broader understanding of events throughout eastern North Carolina during conflict. Topics covered will look at economics, engagements, politics, soldiers' lives and also divert into more obscured subjects such as involvement on African Americans and women.
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Record #:
21223
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An examination of the two week occupation and plundering of Beaufort by British troops that began on April 5, 1782, a full six months after Lord Cornwallis' surrender at Yorktown, to identify why the battle took place, what the purpose of the invasion was, and why coastal North Carolina was targeted so late in the Revolutionary War. Particular attention is given to the career of the mastermind of the attack, North Carolina loyalist John Cruden, the commissioner of sequestered estates for Lord Cornwallis, and his motives for attachment to the British cause.
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Record #:
21319
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In the 1896 gubernatorial race, black Republican voters were divided over the candidacy of Daniel L. Russell. Conservative black Republicans opposed Russell because of his wish of fusion with the Populist Party and detesting his public racial insults. Others favored fusion with the Populists as a means of avoiding Democratic dominance and the expected racial prejudice. A victorious Russell was brought about by good organizational tactics and a bulk of black voters brought over by Democratic anti-black campaign rhetoric.
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Record #:
21328
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During the American Revolution, John Llewelyn led a group of loyalists against the North Carolina state government, both spiritually and militarily. This Tory group opposed a series of laws passed by the North Carolina congress and fought to dis-establish the Anglican Church, against the oath of allegiance to the new state government and the military draft. Several members were caught and tried but most were released.
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Record #:
21358
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An examination of the role of North Carolina in the 1794 rebellion against the federal excise tax on domestic spirits, also known as the whiskey tax, which began with the revolt of 7000 farmers in western Pennsylvania. Resistance to the tax within North Carolina helped define the state's political orientation in the new republic and shaped its emerging political culture.
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Record #:
21701
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This article examines the decision of Gordon Gray, chair of the Personnel Security Board of the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in 1954, to deny security clearance to Robert Oppenheimer. Viewed by some as being part of the 'Red Scare,' the decision was approved based on Oppenheimer's associations, conduct, and opposition to national policy regarding the hydrogen bomb.
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Record #:
6206
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Abstract:
Before the 1920s, most of the roads in North Carolina were dirt, and in wet weather, impassable. Enter Harriet Berry, graduate of the State Normal and Industrial College in Greensboro and staff member of the North Carolina State Geological and Economic Survey in 1901 and of the North Carolina Good Roads Association in 1902. She and state geologist Joseph Pratt worked relentlessly for two decades to bring the state good roads. While Pratt went off to war, Berry brought a road bill to the legislature. It was a bitter fight with much opposition, but Berry prevailed. State-funded roads became a reality.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Winter 1984, p15-17, il, por, bibl
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Record #:
16190
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Abstract:
The American Revolution divided the state's African American population because both Loyalists and Patriots promised freedom for slaves. At the time of revolution, African American totaled 25 percent of the state's overall population and of that only 5 percent were free. British enticed groups of slaves to revolt, yet some African Americans independently fought for the colonist; the most famous soldier was John Chavis.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 32 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p18-22, il
Record #:
28628
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Abstract:
North Carolina Governor Daniel L. Russell was a nonconformist who offered radical alternatives to the economic and political dicta of the Democrats during the 1880s. Russell challenged southern sanctities concerning race, class and political party.
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Record #:
28853
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Abstract:
The people who settled in North Carolina brought with them their cultural values, beliefs, customs and arts. These early settlers were heterogeneous, often conflicting ethnic groups whose influence on the state’s history has been both profound and subtle.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, March 1985, p2-3, il