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18 results for Cowell, Rebekah L
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Record #:
11886
Author(s):
Abstract:
At one time vast home development was planned in Chatham County. Nine large luxury subdivisions would have contained 1,921 homes built on 3,238 acres; however, collapse of the housing market has held up the start of some and the foreclosure of others. Cowell discusses the causes and the results, such as the evaporation of an anticipated increase in the county's tax base.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 2, Jan 2010, p14-19, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
13935
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Lincoln Heights is a historically African American community located outside the Roanoke Rapids corporation limits. For the past seventy years the city has regularly dumped its garbage there in three landfills; the city does not provide Lincoln Heights with trash service. Although two of the landfills have since closed, the residents are still living among the dumps. Cowell discusses this problem and the waste transfer station that the city proposes to build there.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 7, Feb 2011, p17-21, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
15627
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Orange and Guilford Counties, neighbors are fighting landfill expansions. Cowell examines the problems with continual expansion of landfills in North Carolina, especially in low-income, minority communities.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 27, July 2011, p15-19, map, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
15632
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Abstract:
In 2009, the board of commissioners for Chatham County unanimously adopted a resolution acknowledging that undocumented immigrants live in and contribute to their communities. The resolution went on to ask the local law enforcement decline to enter into agreements with Immigrations and Customs Enforcement to enforce federal immigration laws. Recent voting to rescind this resolution is causing problems associated with racial profiling, civil rights violations, and immigration concerns.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 23, June 2011, p11 Periodical Website
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Record #:
15633
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Abstract:
SCAAP is a federal program administered through the Bureau of Justice Assistance that provides funds to local law enforcement agencies. Law enforcement receives the money to jail undocumented immigrants who have been convicted of one felony or two misdemeanors. Congress is proposing cutting the program by more than 60 percent by 2012.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 23, June 2011, p13, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
27832
Author(s):
Abstract:
Controversy has surrounded Chatham County’s school board race. An error was made when drawing lines for the Board of Education Districts 13 years ago and was recently corrected. This change will affect the race for seats on the school board. The Board of Education has asked county commissioners to re-draw the districts. This would require the General Assembly to amend state law to change the rules on re-drawing districts and the changes may not happen before the election. Maps included in article.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 4, January 2010, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
27833
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Raleigh Institute of Contemporary Art is now open. The new art school’s model of instruction is to have new artists learn alongside working artists. These local working artists teach students in the studio and focus their instruction on practical instruction and not classical training. The center was founded by Raleigh artist Mia Yoon. The school will focus on conceptual art, assemblage of found materials, urban art, visual journalism, collage, drawing, graphic design, photography, and more.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 4, January 2010, p21 Periodical Website
Record #:
27847
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Shakori Hills GrassRoots Festival in Chatham County is raising money to buy the land it currently leases. The nonprofit that produces the festival cannot afford the land but does not want to leave. The festival is growing each year and its lease is almost up. The problem is explored and compared with other national festivals who have experienced similar issues.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 6, February 2010, p39 Periodical Website
Record #:
27863
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many people with eating disorders are exhausting their savings for treatment and some are dying from a lack of insurance coverage. Insurers often do not cover treatment for eating disorders. Area resident Amy Lambert details her struggle with the disorder and its financial burden. Chase Bannister who directs the Carolina House in Durham explains what his treatment facility does to help and Tori Toles of UNC’s Eating Disorder Program also discusses the problems for those wanting treatment.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 8, February 2010, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
27889
Author(s):
Abstract:
A few of the items that were destroyed in the recent Chatham County Courthouse fire are detailed. The fire happened during renovations of the courthouse. The weathervane, judge’s bench, jury box, and witness stand are described by residents who restored the items before the fire destroyed them. The loss of historical material cannot be replaced according to Chatham Historical Museum curator Jane Pyle.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
27914
Author(s):
Abstract:
The expansion of US Highway 64 could further pollute Jordan Lake. The expansion could also uproot Chatham County businesses as they move to accommodate the new expanded road. The road would run from Pittsboro over Jordan Lake to Apex and Cary and would be designed to speed up travel time from Charlotte to Raleigh. The state does not currently have the funding to pay for the expansion and it does not have a plan to work with the federal environmental regulations governing Jordan Lake.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 17, April 2010, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28046
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Abstract:
New Hill Community Association is the winner of a 2010 Indy Citizen Award for their positive contribution to society in the Triangle area. The association is fighting Western Wake Partners who want to put a wastewater treatment plant in the tiny, unincorporated, historically African-American town. Both black and white residents have joined forces to fight the project. The project would serve Cary, Apex, and Morrisville, but not New Hill and there are options to place the plant away from residents which are not being considered.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 47, November 2010, p21 Periodical Website
Record #:
28049
Author(s):
Abstract:
Abortion protesters in Raleigh recently targeted students on the sidewalk outside Enloe High School. Many students were upset at being targeted by protesters and with the material protesters gave them to read on abortions. The subject of the pamphlets is discussed by area experts. The protesters did not violate any laws as the sidewalk considered off-campus, but some students are appealing to local leaders to prevent the protests from taking place before school.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 49, December 2010, p9 Periodical Website
Record #:
27955
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state Senate passed bill S 1209 which places a 14-month moratorium on cities and towns who wish to build their own high-speed broadband networks. The bill hurts many rural communities that the telecommunications companies have not served with high-speed internet. Lobbyists for the telecommunications companies worked hard to support the bill and the companies have contributed to bill sponsor Sen. David Hoyle D-Gaston’s campaign efforts. The bill will now head to the house where it is expected to pass.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 23, June 2010, p11-13 Periodical Website
Record #:
27956
Author(s):
Abstract:
Area residents held a protest outside of Urban Outfitters in Durham. The protest was held in response to the company’s marketing strategies and the demographic they sell to. Amy Lambert led the protest saying that the company encourages women to eat less to fit into their clothing. The image the company suggests women should fit encourages eating disorders and unhealthy living.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 23, June 2010, p17 Periodical Website