NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


39 results for Comer, Susan L
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
4112
Author(s):
Abstract:
The movie industry started in Wilmington in 1983 when Frank Capra, Jr. selected parts of it for the film Firestarter and Dino deLaurentis later built a studio to make his own films. With a film infrastructure now in place, the city did more movie business in 1997 than forty-five states.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4123
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the state's greatest attractions to movie makers is its geographic diversity, featuring mountains and coasts, with big cities and skyscrapers, quaint towns, and farms sprinkled in between. Filmmaking began soon after the N.C. Film Office opened in 1980. Since then over 450 films have been made that have added $5 billion to the economy.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4206
Author(s):
Abstract:
Holly Springs in Wake County had known success from its earliest days. By 1900, it had a reputation for education and commerce. By 1983, progress had passed it by, and the 700 citizens were faced with merging with another town or trying to revitalize theirs. They chose the latter; voted for bonds; and built the first sewer plant. That brought developers. In nine years the population rose to 7,000. The tax base went from $23 million to $500,000 million, and land prices tripled.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4209
Author(s):
Abstract:
From May to November king mackerel tournaments are big business along the state's coast. While events like Southport's U.S. Open King Mackerel Tournament and the Wrightsville Beach King Mackerel Tournament award large prizes, they also benefit local economies. Motels, restaurants, bait and tackle shops, and shops in general benefit. The Atlantic Beach Tournament brings $1.6 million into the local economy.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4296
Author(s):
Abstract:
Orville Hicks of Watauga County is a master storyteller who continues the family tradition of mountain storytelling. He has made numerous appearances in and out of the state and is known for his telling of the Jack tales, among others. In 1997, Governor James B. Hunt presented him the Brown-Hudson Folklore Award, the highest award the North Carolina Folklore Society gives to traditional artists.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4336
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1995, Jean Dugan was elected principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokees. She is the first woman to hold the position. Dugan restructured the tribal government and established stringent financial controls. Her predecessor was impeached on charges of misusing funds. In the fall 1999 election, she was upset in her bid for reelection.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4564
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rowan County in the 1700s was a junction of two major roads: the Great Pennsylvania Wagon Road and the Warrior's Trading Path. Records of who passed through, who settled, then moved on, were stored in the courthouse at Salisbury. Through the single-handed efforts of Mary Elizabeth Gaskill McCubbins, who amassed over 150,000 pieces of genealogical information, the records were made more accessible to the public. Today the Rowan Public Library's genealogical section, with 4,000 microfilms, 20,000 books, and the McCubbins' Collection, is one of the nation's top genealogical research libraries.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4685
Author(s):
Abstract:
Oriental, located in Pamlico County, was a thriving port city in the early 1900s. With a population now of 800, this city that was named for a sunken ship calls itself \"The Sailing Capital of the Carolinas.\" Oriental attracts people who enjoy sailing and an easygoing lifestyle. Comer relates the town's history and describes the community's landscape and attitudes.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 3, Aug 2000, p20-21, 23-25 Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
4766
Author(s):
Abstract:
A semblance of a town since the 1840s, Tabor City in Columbus County was incorporated in 1905. Known as \"The Yam Capital of the World,\" the town of 3,000 residents celebrates its largest annual event, the North Carolina Yam Festival, the fourth weekend in October. It is also the home of Horace Carter, founder of the Tabor Tribune, whose courageous anti-Ku Klux Klan editorials won the 1953 Pulitzer Prize for Meritorious Service. Comer describes what visitors to the town will find and what the town seeks for its future.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4862
Author(s):
Abstract:
Love Valley, located in Iredell County, is the \"Cowboy Capital of North Carolina.\" The town was the dream of Andy Barker, who started it in 1954. It requires that all buildings look one hundred years old and prohibits automobiles on the main street. The residents in this working Western town observe the Code of the West of loyalty and honesty.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4920
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Sea Turtle Protection Program, which is run by the Wildlife Resources Commission, seeks to protect sea turtle nests and hatchlings and to collect mortality data. Comer describes how the Holden Beach Sea Turtle Watch caries out this mission and how stranded, sick, and injured sea turtles are handled.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4922
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thousands of North Carolinians who listen to and enjoy jazz are unaware that many world-famous performers are from the state. They include Percy Heath, Billy Taylor, Maceo Parker, John Coltrane, and Thelonius Monk.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
4971
Author(s):
Abstract:
Comer recounts the past and present history of the county seat of Union County. In this town founded in 1844, William Henry Belk founded a department store and the high school drum major was Jesse Helms.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
5256
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rutherfordton is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The county seat of Rutherford County, the town at one time had the only private mint ever operated in the Southeast. In 1887, the railroad's coming brought business and tourism. Today the town seeks to revitalize its historic downtown district.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 3, Aug 2002, p18-20, 22, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
5249
Author(s):
Abstract:
Warsaw, in Duplin County, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. Comer discusses the history of the town which lies just minutes away from all five of the state's military bases and is home to the world's top turkey and hog producers, Carolina Turkey and Murphy Farms, respectively.
Source:
Full Text: