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35 results for Chase, Nan K
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Record #:
2598
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Concern of Watauga County farmers about childhood leukemia brought a change in pesticide and herbicide use. Crop and Christmas tree yields are up, wildlife has increased, and the leukemia rate has fallen in six years.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 6, Nov 1995, p3, il, bibl
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Record #:
5868
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Chase discusses Penderlea Homesteads, a planned farm community built in Pender County during the Great Depression to improve poor living conditions. Penderlea was the first of one hundred similar communities built nationwide as part of the federal government's New Deal program.
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Record #:
6416
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North Carolina is home to over two dozen wineries, ranging from multi-million dollar operations to small mom-and-pop ones. Chase takes the reader on a tour of several, including RagApple Lassie Vineyards (Boonville); Westbend Vineyards (Lewisville); Windy Gap Vineyards (Ronda); and Chateau Laurinda (Sparta).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 9, Feb 2004, p76-78,80-81, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6915
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Fund raising for needed school items is an annual event in school systems across the country. The Bethel Elementary School, located in Bethel, a small community in Watauga County, has one of the most unique approaches. In 1999, Bob and Marilyn Prejean began selling pumpkin seeds at ten dollars a package. All the money was donated to the school. In the fall, community members would gather to see who had raised the biggest pumpkin. The winner took home bragging rights and a trophy to keep until the following fall. The winning pumpkin in 2003 weighed in at 226 pounds.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p92-94, 96, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7775
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In the late 19th-century, George Vanderbilt purchased 100,000 acres in western North Carolina near Asheville and had a 250-room mansion constructed. He envisioned an Old World estate that could produce enough vegetables, fruits, and meats to support its working population. Chase discusses the foods available and what the family dined on. While food served at glittering banquets included Lobster Newberg and Consommé Royale, the family, when alone, generally dined on the simple, wholesome foods that sustained farm families around the state at the close of the 19th-century.
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Record #:
7999
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Organic farming, or farming without chemical pesticides or synthetic fertilizers, is a growing trend in North Carolina. With the decline of the tobacco economy, there is a movement toward producing a wide range of foods locally and organically. The Blue Ridge Community College in Flat Rock held its first Organic Growers School in 1994. Over the next few years one or two hundred people attended the one-day event. In 2006, the event drew 1,100 people from North Carolina and fourteen other states. The school featured fifty-six class sessions in fourteen tracks from soil science to marketing, nine half-day workshops, a full-day children's program, and three vendor talks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p116-118, 120-121, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10413
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Watauga County, a scenic mountain county, is OUR STATE magazine's featured county of the month. Located in the high country, the county offers refreshingly cool temperatures and year-round recreation. Things to see and do include shopping downtown Boone, the Mast General Store, mountain biking, and the Tweetsie Railroad.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 6, Nov 2008, p162-164, 166, 168, 170, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17368
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Chase describes the evolution of Curve Studios and Garden which is located close to the French Broad River in Asheville's River Arts District. The garden is bordered with elegant flowerbeds and enhanced with quiet seating areas and lots of sculpture. Patty Torno owns the Curve Studios complex and tends the garden in all the seasons.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 24 Issue 7, Sept 2012, p30-35, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
17399
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Seed catalogs do more than sell seeds. In this country they date back to the early 1800s, and the Smithsonian has a collection of some 10,000. In the pages are found information about plant history, planting and harvest times, growing habits, pest control, and other items. Chase includes a brief description and the URL for some of her favorite catalogs--Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds, Territorial Seed Company, and John Scheepers Kitchen Garden Seeds.
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Record #:
21185
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Plants in the Carolinas run the gamut of colors through the seasons--pastels in the spring, summer with many shades of green foliage, fall with vibrant gold and red-hued leaves. Winter is commonly overlooked with many individuals picturing it as dull and gray. Chase reminds us that there are colors to be seen in winter--winter skies shine with a blue intensity; a number of windflowers have their special winter niches; holly trees with bright red berries; mosses and lichens brighten the scene; and for a surprise color--yellow.
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Record #:
21864
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Through the years Chase has created gardens that would help feed her family. Recently she has been exploring \"drinkable\" gardens--plants that become beverages, wines, juices, ciders, teas, and syrups. Using yield, reliability, and ease of care as determinants, Chase presents five choices of drinkable plants for the Carolinas--crabapple, serviceberry, prickly pear cactus, muscadine, and bay laurel.
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Record #:
22308
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Pleasant Gardens, located on U. S. 70, between Old Fort and Marion, is one of those interesting places that can be found by not always taking the Interstates. Chase describes some of the places visitors can explore, such as Fletcher Greenhouse and Nursery, the historic Carson House, and the workshop of famed chair maker Max Woody, a sixth generation craftsman.
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Record #:
22350
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Asheville is the first official Bee City USA. This means it supports sustainable habitats for bees. Bee populations which are necessary for much of the food production have been declining. Encouraging pollinator-friendly habitats is a step toward reversing the trend.
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Record #:
22372
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Chase describes the work of Valle Crucis artist Lowell Hayes, whose paintings capture that prebud period between winter and spring in Western North Carolina. He was influenced by Chinese painters whose work captured that period in their country which started his thinking about the same thing happening in his own Appalachian area.
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22384
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Rutherford County's Hickory Nut Gorge encompasses Chimney Rock, a 2,280-foot monolith that towers over the gorge and nearby river and gives scenic views as far as 75 miles. Lucius Morse and his brothers purchased it in 1902, for $5,000 and planned to develop it as a tourist attraction. The park has belonged to the Morse family ever since. Recently the family decided to sell and put a price of $55 million on their property. There were fears among residents that a developer might buy it. However, negotiations between the family and the NC Division of State Parks ended with the state buying it for $24 million.
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