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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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40 results for Buescher, Paul A
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Record #:
1896
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1988 North Carolina implemented a new birth certificate form, adding new items and revising others in order to elicit better information on demographic, behavioral, and medical factors influencing fertility and pregnancy outcomes.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 58, June 1991, p1-15, il, bibl
Record #:
3389
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smoking by expectant mothers contributes to low birthweight babies and other problems. Smoking cessation programs would reduce this. Target smokers include whites and American Indians, and women who are unmarried or whose educational level is low.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 101, Oct 1996, p1-13, il, bibl
Record #:
3986
Author(s):
Abstract:
Alcohol use is common among those under twenty-one years of age. Not only is it a contributing factor in many fatal car crashes, it is also associated with suicides, murders, drowning, and health problems, including alcohol poisoning, dependence, liver disease, and various cancers.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 111, Sept 1998, p1-10, il, bibl
Record #:
4119
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asthma is a common illness among children, through the age of fourteen, and it is one of the most important reasons children are hospitalized in the state. From 1995 to 1997, asthma hospitalizations averaged 6,500 per year. The illness rate is higher in rural areas than in urban ones.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 113, Mar 1999, p1-10, il, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
29384
Author(s):
Abstract:
A study conducted in 1980 examined inpatient utilization of nonfederal short-stay general hospitals by North Carolina residents. This report presents the hospital utilization rates for selected diagnosis groups and for selected surgical procedures by county of residents of the patients. Results show that county hospital use rates vary between Medicare patients and Medicaid patients.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 24, Feb 1983, p1-23, bibl, f
Record #:
29385
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1980 and 1981, data were collected by the State Health Planning Agency in North Carolina concerning emergency room utilization by Medicaid eligible patients. This report presents a summary of these data and analysis. Results show that high emergency room use is correlated with a low rate of use of primary care services.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 25, Mar 1983, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29394
Author(s):
Abstract:
Infant mortality is a problem throughout the United States. Birth-weight standardization was used to compare North Carolina neonatal mortality to that in the United States and also to examine trends. The study found that North Carolina had a higher neonatal mortality rate, which can be attributed to lower birth weights, rather than higher weight-specific neonatal death rates.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 30, Dec 1983, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
29396
Author(s):
Abstract:
This report examines the degree of multiple hospitalization in North Carolina for patients grouped by age, race, sex, diagnosis group, and hospital size. The results are compared to those found in other studies of multiple hospitalization.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 32, May 1984, p1-3, bibl, f
Record #:
29406
Author(s):
Abstract:
The impact of a comprehensive prenatal care program on the birthweights of infants born to low-income women in North Carolina was assessed. Women receiving prenatal care at the Guilford County public health department were compared to women on Medicaid, who received prenatal care mainly from private-practice physicians.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 39, Mar 1986, p1-11, bibl, f
Record #:
29495
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has not yet adopted the new national model certificate of live birth, and still uses the birth certificate and death certificate that were adopted in the late 1980s. Because race is perceived in different ways by different people, race as collected on vital records is imprecise. This report compared race and ethnicity of the mother reported on the live birth certificates with race and ethnicity of the decedent reported on the matching infant death certificate.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 156, Feb 2008, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
24886
Abstract:
The life expectancy is affected by factors such as how many years will be spent in good mental health, good health and good mobility. This survey shows significant factors affecting health and life expectancy in North Carolina.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 129, Jan 2002, p1-16, il, bibl, f
Record #:
1639
Abstract:
High mortality rates among blacks and persons of low socioeconomic status are a fact. The interaction of race, socioeconomic status and educational level could lend insight into the root causes of high mortality rates in certain groups.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 82, Apr 1994, p1-11, bibl, f
Record #:
1893
Abstract:
Pregnant women who participated in the special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) were compared to pregnant women not in the program. The results were favorable for the WIC participants.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 55, Mar 1991, p1-8, il, bibl
Record #:
2597
Abstract:
1,655 perinatal deaths (stillborn and neo-natal) occurred in the state in 1992. While the risk factors for perinatal mortality vary between blacks and whites, mortality is higher for blacks.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 97, Sept 1995, p1-10, il, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
24880
Abstract:
Robert Meyer and Paul Buescher conducted a study on deaths caused by induced abortion over a 25-year period. They determined the average age, and most frequent age and race associated with death from induced abortion.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. 70 Issue , December 1992, p1-7, il, bibl, f