NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for Barbour, Ruth P
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
8406
Author(s):
Abstract:
Appleton Oaksmith was born in Maine, the son of parents who were to become prominent in the Victorian literary world. Oaksmith left Maine for a life of adventure on the seas and made voyages to China, Panama, Nicaragua, Peru, and the Congo. During the Civil War, he was arrested for slave trading but escaped from jail. He began blockade-running, transporting arms and ammunition to the Confederacy. After the war he became a correspondent for the LONDON GLOBE, covering the Franco-Prussian War. Later he bought land in Beaufort. He invested in the railroad industry and was a member of the North Carolina House of Representatives in 1874. On July 4, 1879, Oaksmith lost three of his children in a boating accident and, he retreated from public life. He died in 1887 and is buried at Hollywood, his Beaufort estate.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p20-22,, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
8978
Author(s):
Abstract:
The SNAP DRAGON was a two-topsail schooner used by privateer Otway Burns during the War of 1812. Captured in 1814, there is no American information as to what happened to the ship after its capture. British records show it was bought at auction and sailed to Jamaica in 1815. The final entry says she left Jamaica in 1816, and the trail of the schooner ends there.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 6, Nov 1980, p12-14, il
Full Text:
Record #:
34651
Author(s):
Abstract:
The War of 1812, while often forgotten, was significant for the United States as it challenged Great Britain’s maritime supremacy and established the right for all nations to use American waterways for international commerce. Otway Burns, a merchant Captain from Swansboro, North Carolina, served as a privateer during the War of 1812. Over the course of the War, Burns captured 42 English vessels and took 300 British citizens prisoner. Such acts supported the burgeoning U.S. Navy by removing the British threat to maritime commerce. Following the war, Burns adopted shipbuilding and built the first North Carolinian steam vessel.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p4-6, il
Record #:
34648
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the late 20th century, the grave of Revolutionary War-era colonist, Robert Williams, was discovered in Morehead City. During the Revolutionary War, Williams worked in Beaufort as a colonial salt maker. The salt works, established 1776, were erected to decrease American dependence on European salt imports. Following the war, the salt making trend continued and production again spiked with salt shortages during the American Civil War.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spring 2001, p21-22, il
Record #:
34673
Author(s):
Abstract:
Frank Salisbury was editor of the Morehead City newspaper between 1924 and 1964. A photographer and founder of the Carteret County Historical Society, Salisbury was interested in preserving and documenting Carteret County’s heritage, both historic and modern. He made an effort to record many historic structures in town, and was a well published author on the history of Morehead City.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p3-5, il, por
Record #:
34703
Author(s):
Abstract:
Diamond City, North Carolina, was once home to fifty families who were actively engaged with homesteading and fishing. Additional income was found when ships and their cargoes washed ashore; many materials were incorporated into house construction. While access to resources made life difficult, it was the 1899 hurricane which brought an end to the small community. The storm hit the coast and many families decided to return to the mainland. Some even brought their homes with them across the sound.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p18-19, il
Record #:
34756
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1992, a Morehead City resident caught sight of a ghostly apparition aboard the tug LOCKWOOD. Purchased in 1983 for scrap, the vessel was reportedly haunted. Eyewitnesses describe a ghostly figure walking around the deck. The author and owner of the vessel decided to investigate, but were unable to trace the history of the tug or past incidents on board.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2008, p3-5, il
Record #:
34783
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carteret County author David Stick dedicated much of his career to studying shipwrecks and maritime heroes of the Outer Banks. Beginning as a World War II correspondent in the Pacific Theater, Stick returned to North Carolina and began studying the Graveyard of the Atlantic. Part of his research involved contacting wreck survivors and visiting the vessel, if possible. Towards the end of his life, Stick donated many materials to the Outer Banks History Center for continued use. He passed away in 2009.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010, p1-2, il, por