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16 results for Allhands, William A
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Record #:
14260
Abstract:
It is comparatively easy to gain the top of Mount Mitchell today, but conditions were greatly different before the advent of good roads in the mountain area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 4, June 1947, p3-4, 25-26, f
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Record #:
14267
Abstract:
The mountain county of Polk has a rather odd distinction - it has existed as a county twice, having been formed twice from the same territory, once for a brief period in 1846 and again for good in 1849.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 5, July 1947, p5, f
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Record #:
14437
Abstract:
Lumbering used to be a dangerous, thrilling and strenuous operation, particularly during the days of poor highway and rail transportation, but conditions in recent years have changed.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 26, Nov 1947, p6-7, f
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Record #:
14443
Abstract:
According to the North Carolina edition of Williams' Almanac for 1840, North Carolina had no state debt; the Governor made $2,000 a year; tax revenue was $110,000 annually, and the state's population was 737,987.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 28, Dec 1947, p8, 20
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Record #:
14494
Abstract:
Sylva, the county seat of Jackson County, received its name from William D. Sylva, but to this day the people of Jackson County know practically nothing about him.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 3, June 1945, p19-20
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Record #:
14523
Abstract:
Remembered as the \"poet of cottonland\", John Charles McNeil recaptured, with the magic of his pen, the simple charm and lasing beauty of country life.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 13, Aug 1945, p6-7, il
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Record #:
14534
Abstract:
It has been only during recent years that the well-known and popular scenic attraction of Chimney Rock has been accessible to the public.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 19, Oct 1945, p14, 24, f
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Record #:
14548
Abstract:
Originally there were the buffalo trails in western North Carolina. Then came the paths made by Indians, and finally the rough roads built by early settlers.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 27, Dec 1945, p26-27, f
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Record #:
14542
Abstract:
The construction of railroads in western Carolina was a terrific undertaking. There were only two approaches, one from the south and one from the east.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 23, Nov 1945, p6-7, f
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Record #:
14573
Abstract:
Among the Cherokees whose memory is still being kept alive are Chuttahsotee, Yonaguska, Cornsilk, and Junaluska. Each was a great leader among their people.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 33, Jan 1946, p11, 30
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Record #:
14637
Abstract:
Captain James Jack was responsible for delivering Mecklenburg County's declaration of independence from British rule. On the morning of May 20th, 1775, a group of prominent male citizens unanimously adopted the Declaration of Independence and called upon Captain James Jack to deliver it to Congress meeting in Philadelphia. He rode from Charlotte to Philadelphia, a trip reported to take 18-20 days by horseback. The declaration was given to North Carolina delegates, an act ahead of even Congress' decision to declare independence from Britain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 32, Jan 1947, p6-7
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Record #:
14808
Abstract:
Although not as widely remembered as his illustrious brother, General Robert B. Vance was a great soldier, an able representative in Congress, and a poet of recognized ability.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 36, Feb 1945, p24
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Record #:
14817
Abstract:
Griffith Rutherford, for whom Rutherford County was named, was a prominent and colorful figure in the early history of western North Carolina. He led the only large-scale campaign against the Indians in the mountain area. He was also a pioneer, statesman, distinguished solider, and a Brigadier General in the Revolutionary War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 38, Feb 1945, p18
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Record #:
14856
Abstract:
Corundum was discovered in the mountains of North Carolina in 1871 near the Cullasaja River, making mining history. Corundum is the hardest mineral known, with the exception of the diamond, and is used for grinding and shaping tools, polishing, and bearings in watches and scientific apparatus. The discovery of this mineral promised to be a tremendous development especially for the industrial world.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 51, May 1945, p6, 17
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Record #:
20625
Abstract:
Zebulon Baird Vance is remembered as a great Civil War soldier and governor, as well as a great statesman. Allhands examines another side of his character--his sense of humor which made him a big favorite with all whom he came in contact.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 33, Jan 1946, p1, 22
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