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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for "West, John Foster"
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Record #:
24483
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The Blue Ridge Parkway was not the first scenic road in the region. Dr. Joseph Pratt (1870-1942) mapped the Crest of the Blue Ridge Highway, a route planned in 1909 that went along much of the southern spine of the Blue Ridge.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 8, January 1978, p10-11, il, por
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Record #:
31636
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John Foster West of Wilkes County is a writer of Appalachian folklore and folkways. West and photographer Bruce Roberts published a book of poems and photographs of life in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Selections from their book, “This Proud Land,” are presented in this article.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan 1975, p6-7, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35705
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A poem about a Confederate soldier who was shot for deserting.
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Record #:
35725
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A poem about how a woman apparently became pregnant with the devil’s baby.
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Record #:
35663
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A poem about a woman who knew when her husband had been killed in the Civil War because she saw an angel fly into the sky.
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Record #:
35533
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Taken from his own family history, the author recounts a story told by his Aunt Nancy, about an old musket, which had been present for most of the interesting stories that the family had.
Record #:
35549
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After visiting family in Texas, two people become anxious to get back to an area that has hills.
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Record #:
10641
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John Foster West goes behind the folklore to discover the recorded facts in the murder trial of Tom Dula. Dula, who was hanged for the murder of Laura Foster in 1868, is the subject of an enduring ballad and something of a folk hero in western North Carolina. In 1958, the Kingston Trio released a version of the folk ballad that was the number one song in the country. According to West, although Dula's case went to the state Supreme Court twice and the records from those trials are preserved by the State Department of Archives and History, no writer before him had ever bothered to examine the Dula records in detail. Through examination of court records and Wilkes County census records, West recreates the events that occurred in Ferguson, NC and fills out the missing details surrounding the case, including the unknown family members of the victim and the accused. West's book is entitled THE BALLAD OF TOM DULA; THE DOCUMENTED STORY BEHIND THE MURDER OF LAURA FOSTER AND THE TRIALS AND EXECUTION OF TOM DULA.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 16, Jan 1971, p16-18, 32, il, por, map
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Record #:
35446
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Kathleen Morehouse wrote Rain on the Just in the latter half of the nineteenth century, about the fictional Allen family in Wilkesboro, NC. A synopsis of the novel is given, and then the elements of folklore, particularly folk speech, are identified and discussed.
Record #:
35451
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A poem about a travelling preacher who has relations with the young women of the towns on his route.
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Record #:
35462
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A short story about a man who left his shoes after having an affair with a married woman, and the encounter with the husband the next day, who returned the shoes.
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Record #:
35474
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A poem about a boy who tried to follow in Icarus’s wing-flaps.
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Record #:
35371
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A poem about a man who left specific instructions for his burial upon his death, particularly about not wanting to be buried in a church yard. However, his burial ground ended up being part of a church several years later.
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Record #:
16457
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In the Appalachians of North Carolina, a child was trained, sustained, and entertained through the folklore of childhood. In the cradle they were comforted by regional lullabies, and on the parents' knees, by rhythmical verse. Later on, communal participation involved the young in folk games, dances, riddle solving, ballad singing, superstitions, and cures for childhood afflictions.
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