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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for "Solberg, Patrice"
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Record #:
26270
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina requires parental consent before health care providers may render most types of medical care to minors, but courts and legislatures have begun to create exceptions to the rule. Proponents argue the laws are necessary to protect the health of the minor who would not seek medical care if parental consent were required. Opponents argue that the state is insinuating their way into the parent-child relationship and threatening family integrity.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 55, Feb 1980, p1-15, f
Record #:
26269
Author(s):
Abstract:
The courts recognize the deceased’s next of kin have the rights to possess the dead body for purpose of burial, and to possess the corpse in the same condition as it was found. North Carolina litigation concerning dead bodies has centered on mutilation, unauthorized autopsies, unauthorized embalming, wrongful detention, failure to properly dispose of the body, and unauthorized photographs of the decedent.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 56, June 1980, p1-12, f
Record #:
18353
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1979, the Wake Medical Center agreed to pay $1.15 million to settle a malpractice case out of court. At the same time, a malpractice suit was filed against the Wake County Health Department alleging negligence. Both of these suits give cause to reevaluate the actions taken by the 1976 North Carolina General Assembly to ward off a perceived, impending malpractice crisis.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Fall 1979, p10-15
Subject(s):
Record #:
26272
Author(s):
Abstract:
Decisions from the 1979 General Assembly of North Carolina broadened the powers of local health directors, amended several licensing laws, and clarified the brain-death law. One very significant change was an act allowing pharmacists to substitute less expensive generic drugs for brand-name drugs that are prescribed.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 53, July 1979, p1-14, f
Record #:
18320
Author(s):
Abstract:
The abortion questions has created more dissension than any political issues since school busing. This article discusses the impact of cases such as Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Danforth on North Carolina law.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Winter 1977, p23-26, f
Record #:
19955
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1977 North Carolina General Assembly focused on a variety of health care issues. There were a number of nationwide concerns which the legislature provided a response to, such as--Should minors receive contraceptives without parental consent? and Do terminally ill patients like Karen Ann Quinlan have a right to die?
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 48, Jul 1977, p1-14
Record #:
19954
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1977 North Carolina General Assembly has considered many bills affecting health care providers. This article gives a brief description of some of them and their status as of April 30, 1977.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 47, 1977, p1-4
Record #:
19956
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article seeks to clear up any misunderstandings of the North Carolina drug laws and how they are handled and administered by medical professionals.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 49, Oct 1977, p1-7, f
Record #:
26276
Abstract:
North Carolina law provides for the appointment of a guardian who can give substitute consent for incompetent patients. There are many problems with the present statute, but the most obvious is that the present proceedings are unconstitutional. An alternative guardianship statute is proposed to provide for a limited guardianship for handicapped adults.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 46, Feb 1977, p1-4, f
Record #:
26277
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent Supreme Court decisions have radically altered North Carolina’s laws concerning a minor’s consent to treatment. Minors have the right to consent to abortions during the first three months of pregnancy, the right to obtain pregnancy tests, and may receive family planning services without their parents’ permission.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 45, Dec 1976, p1-7, f