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35 results for "Seay, Majel Ivey"
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Record #:
14789
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Johnson Blakely is considered a lively historic character, though not native to North Carolina, who quickly gained notoriety in the state. Blakely moved from Ireland to Wilmington in 1781 as a boy and when old enough attended University of North Carolina. He gained a reputation for fearlessness at the University which carried through to his naval career. In 1799 he joined the Navy and served as a midshipman for 12 years. Promoted to lieutenant, he captained the brig Enterprise and then the brig Wasp. His career ended aboard the Wasp when the ship went missing; last seen on October 19, 1814.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 4, June 1943, p6, por
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Record #:
15094
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Linville Caverns lie below Humpack Mountain between Marion and Linville. It opened formally in 1939 by Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Collins who leased the property. The couple installed electric lights and hired guides to make the caverns accessible to the public. Historically the caverns were used for more than tourism. During the Civil War, Confederate soldiers deserting the army hid out in the cavern. Slaves would meet in the caverns to sing and dance in the safety of the caves.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 16, Sept 1941, p6-7, 32, il
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Record #:
15134
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On two different occasions, vast sums of money have been spent in order to obliterate Lake Mattamuskeet through systems of pumping in order to use the land for crops. However, nature has refused to be conquered and the Lake has continually returned. In 1934, the Federal Government purchased the Lake as a migratory waterfowl refuge and black bass feeding ground.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 46, Apr 1941, p10-11, f
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Record #:
15242
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Miss Ella Butler of the Moravian settlement of Old Salem is making candles, a definite harbinger of Christmas. For about two months before Christmas, Miss Ella busies herself with her annual task of making by hand, in exactly the same holds and in the same manner as they were made in 1766, the more than 10,000 candles used for the Moravian Christmas Love Feast observed by all the churches of the Southern Moravian Province comprising North Carolina and Virginia.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 29, Dec 1939, p1-2, f
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Record #:
15278
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Elisha Mitchell, scientist, minister, and University of North Carolina professor, lost his life trying to prove that Black Dome, now called Mount Mitchell, was the highest peak in the eastern United States. In 1881-1882, the United States Geological Service confirmed his measurements and named the peak after him. Mitchell determined its height in 1835 and was killed in a fall on the mountain in 1857.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 23, Nov 1934, p5, 26, il
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Record #:
15373
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After July 1 1935, the state's criminals sentenced to death received lethal injection rather than the being sent to the electric chair. Henry Spivey was the last convict hanged near Abbottsburg on March 11, 1910. The day before, Walter Morrison was the first man to be electrocuted. Twenty-five years of electrocutions left 150 men dead, 120 were African-American. North Carolina's adoption of lethal injection in 1935 made it only the fourth state to switch.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 5, June 1935, p20
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Record #:
15374
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Colonel Samuel Davidson bravely explored western North Carolina and was a trailblazer for future settlers. Davidson with his wife, daughter, and servant settled at the base of Jones Mountain in July, 1784. He would be murdered by members of the Cherokee tribe and his wife, child, and servant fled fifteen miles back to the safety of Old Fort.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1935, p2
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Record #:
15397
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High atop a hill just off the main thoroughfare of the little mountain city of Tryon, is located one of the most original and interesting enterprises - the Tryon Toy-Makers and Wood Carvers. It was after the World War and George W. Vanderbilt's death at Biltmore that the novel industry had its beginning. Miss Eleanor Vance and Miss Charlotte Yale, the originators and owners of the shops, were also originators of the handicraft work of the Biltmore Industries, where they worked for fourteen years. At this shop they not only make toys but teach handicraft, weaving, wood carving, and toy making.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 6, July 1936, p3, f
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Record #:
15452
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Started in 1837, Davidson College will celebrate its hundredth anniversary this year. The history of the institution has been one of steady progress. The College was first organized as a manual labor seminary, named in honor of General William Lee Davidson of Revolutionary fame. Today, the College has a rating second to none in the country, an endowment of approximately a million dollars, with grounds, buildings, and equipment valued at around two million dollars.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 37, Feb 1937, p3, 16, f
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Record #:
15461
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A scenic effect that is the praise of travelers from all parts of the nation is found down in the valley between Heartbreak Ridge and Bernard Mountain, 1,500 feet above sea level. This is Andrews' Geyser, which commemorates the memory of Colonel A.B. Andrews of Raleigh a noted Confederate soldier and civic and political leader of Raleigh.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 43, Mar 1937, p3, f
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Record #:
15467
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When the colonists of the Albemarle section of North Carolina were in danger, Betsy Dowdy rode her pony in 1775 to spread the news and succeeded in halting the advance of the British troops into North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 47, Apr 1937, p5
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Record #:
15485
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Indigenous tobacco plants satisfied early settlers' appetites but in 1852 the first \"bright leaf\" tobacco was grown and started the state's tobacco boom. The popularity of J. L. Green's tobacco with Civil War soldiers created the world-famous \"Bull Durham\" brand. The Duke's became prolific tobacco farmers and the \"Duke's Mixture\" helped J. B. Duke form the American Tobacco Company. The tobacco industry was not limited to the 'Triangle' and places like Winston-Salem became cigarette manufacturing locales.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 17, Sept 1935, p7, 19, il
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Record #:
15483
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In the olden days in North Carolina, a real gentleman considered that there was only one way to settle a dispute and that was with a duel. Many famous duels have taken place in North Carolina, both before and since a drastic law against them was passed in 1803, but none have been more famous than the Spaight-Stanly, Carson-Vance, and Stanly-Henry duels.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 33, Jan 1936, p6
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Record #:
15509
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Mrs. Paul Webb, Sr. cared for the historic homestead in Shelby. The Old Southern Homestead was transformed into a museum of southern antiquities. Mrs. Webb Sr. collected art, artifacts, and folk crafts representative of the state's history. Along with these pieces, Mrs. Webb Sr. also renovated the interior of the homestead to reflect the historic character of a typical plantation 'big house.'
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 50, May 1936, p3, 26, il
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Record #:
15526
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The shortia, so far as known, grows nowhere else in the world except in certain area of the state's mountains. The flower was found by Andre Michaux, the famous French botanist, on a trip through the state's mountains in 1787. It remained unnamed until Dr. Asa Gray, the American botanist, discovered it on a trip to Paris in 1838 and named it in honor of Professor Short of Kentucky. It was rediscovered in the mountains in 1877.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 39, Feb 1935, p21, il
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