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39 results for "Pittard, Janet C"
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Record #:
7641
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The Virginia Creeper was a short-line train that ran seventy-five miles from Abington, Virginia to Elkland, now known as Todd. It was in operation from 1900 to 1977. The train was nicknamed the Creeper because mountain terrain limited its maximum speed to twenty-five miles an hour. Ashe County artist Stephen Shoemaker has fond memories of the train as it passed through his hometown of West Jefferson. He is currently painting a series of eight pictures based on the train. Shoemaker discusses his work and other paintings and what drew him to the series of train paintings.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p146-148, 150, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7952
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The North Carolina Arts Incubator, located in downtown Siler City, is the brainchild of Leon Tongret, former director of the small business center at Central Carolina Community College. Business incubators were started by the federal government in the 1980s, and today there are over 2,000 nationwide. Only seven are oriented toward the arts. There are over forty business incubators in the state, but Siler City has the only arts one. Among the things an arts incubator does is offer customized work space to artists. With 70,000 square feet in seven buildings, Siler City's incubator is the largest in the nation, with a planned expansion to 250,000 square feet. Pittard describes the project which links together the arts, historic preservation, and economic development.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p134-136, 138, 140-141, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8120
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The story of the Plott hound begins in 1750 when Johannes Plott emigrated to colonial America from Heidelberg, Germany. He brought with him two Hanoverian-type Schweisshunds (bloodhounds). Plott eventually settled in New Bern, married, had three sons, and then moved on to Cabarrus County. His descendants continued to live in the Smoky Mountains and breed the dogs. The Plott hound is an intelligent animal, has a formidable reputation as a hunter, and tends to be a one-person dog. In 1946, the dog was recognized by the United Kennel Club, and years later by the American Kennel Club. On August 12, 1989, the North Carolina General Assembly officially recognized the Plott hound as the State Dog. At the time, few North Carolinians had ever heard of the hound, much less seen one.
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Record #:
8361
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Funds to repair and conserve items of historical significance are an ongoing need of museums. The Orange County Historical Museum in Hillsborough and the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh have taken a unique approach toward solving this problem. The Adopt an Artifact program allows individuals an opportunity to adopt or sponsor an artifact of their choice for conservation. There is no minimum or maximum amount to donate, and the donations are tax-deductible. The Orange County Museum was the first to start the program several years ago, and the state museum followed in 2006. Pittard discusses how the program operates and the items that have been adopted or need to be adopted.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p162-164, 166, 168, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8493
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North Carolina is one of the top ten states for cultural and heritage tourism. These tourists are interested in visiting historic sites and museums, attending concerts, shopping at farmers markets, and dining at the restaurants where the local people eat. Much of the state's heritage is found along a series of sixteen trails, such as the Art Road and Farmers Trail. The North Carolina Department of Commerce has twelve heritage tourism officers who help communities along the trails in highlighting material that is appropriate to their particular region. Pittard discusses a number of the trails and what they provide to the tourists.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 8, Jan 2007, p68-70, 72, 74-75, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8692
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In the early part of the 20th-century, fathers still taught sons how to run the farm, and few women worked outside the home. On Christmas Day in 1925, Ethel Turlington's husband died, leaving her a young widow with an infant daughter and the family farm in Johnston County. Pittard recounts the story of this determined woman who set an example for her daughter on how to survive and beat the odds. A self-taught farmer, Turlington used resourcefulness and frugality to provide for herself and her daughter, Hortense. She also worked as a bookkeeper for local businesses in Benson. As Hortense grew older, she entered into the farm routine, and at age 21, inherited two-thirds of the farm.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p116-118, 120, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8710
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Margaret Belva Mizelle was born in the town of Windsor in Bertie County in 1918. After graduating from nursing school in Charlotte in 1940, she worked as a private duty nurse. Before the outbreak of World War II, she joined the Army Nurse Corps and was assigned to the U.S. Army 38th Evacuation Hospital Unit. The unit went to England in the summer of 1942. In the fall of 1942, the 38th landed with the troops in Algeria and served in North Africa till September 1943. The 38th landed with the troops at Salerno in September 1943 and at Anzio, Italy in 1944. Mizelle recorded many of her experiences in letters now preserved in the North Carolina State Archives. After serving in Korea, she retired in 1970 with twenty-eight years of service and the rank of Lt. Colonel. Mizelle married Truman King in 1972. She died at the age of eighty-six in 2004.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p144-146, 148, 150-151, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8860
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Born and bred in the Carolinas, the shag has been the official popular dance of North Carolina since the 2005 Session of the General Assembly passed legislation to make it so. Pittard discusses the history of the dance which reportedly has been around since the 1920s. Both North Carolina and South Carolina share the dance and the music it helped bring about. Each state had its own bands, clubs, contests, national shag champions, and disc jockeys who helped spread the dance.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p94-96, 98, 100-101, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9449
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Stuart Nye, the originator of the jewelry that bears his name, began his business on a whim. Returning from World War I, Nye was recuperating at the Veterans Hospital near Asheville. Casting about for an occupation, he began tinkering with jewelry making, and in 1933, became a full time jewelry maker. Most of his designs come from nature and include dogwoods, lilies, pansies, and pine cones. After World War II, he struck up a partnership with Ralph Morris, Sr., and when Nye retired in 1948, Morris continued the business, retaining the well-established name. The business continues this day under the direction of Ralph Morris, Jr.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p138-140, 142, 144, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9599
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Construction of the main building at Peace College began in 1858, with a planned opening for classes in 1861. However, with the outbreak of the Civil War, education was suspended, and the structure served as a Confederate hospital until the end of the war. Union forces then used it for the Freedmen's Bureau until the college took over again.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p136-138, 140, 142-143, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9615
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During World War II, the 100th Infantry Division, known as the Centurymen, fought 185 days of uninterrupted ground combat in France and Germany. Among their accomplishments were liberating or capturing 400 towns and taking 13,000 prisoners. Division casualties were high with 916 killed and 3,656 wounded. Four North Carolinians--Joe Collie, Roland Giduz, Horace Kornegay, and Tom Tillet--served with the 100th and relate their stories.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 6, Nov 2007, p170-172, 174-175, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9616
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Pittard discusses the style and creations of folk artist Marjorie Rose Powell of Mount Olive.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 6, Nov 2007, p178-180, 182, 184, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9825
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The Carolina Ballet Company, founded in Raleigh in 1997, is now in its tenth year. The company has premiered over sixty ballets. Annual tours are made throughout North Carolina, and the ballet has toured in the People's Republic of China, Hungry, and New York City. The Carolina Ballet is recognized by many critics as one of the top ten ballet companies in the country.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 10, Mar 2008, p58-60, 62-63 Periodical Website
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Record #:
9883
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Almost two decades ago West Jefferson was a city in decline with empty storefronts and deteriorating buildings. Pittard discusses how the town has begun to revitalize itself, beginning with the transformation of a grave pit into BackStreet Park.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 11, Apr 2008, p84-86, 88-89, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10135
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Pittard discusses the life and work of David Stick, who is the leading authority on the people and events that shaped the Outer Banks over the last four hundred years. The author of a dozen books and numerous articles, Stick donated his personal library and archives to the North Carolina Office of Archives and History in 1986, to be maintained as a public research center. Located in Manteo, the Outer Banks History Center opened to the public in 1989.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 1, June 2008, p116-118, 120-122, 124, il, por Periodical Website
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