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39 results for "Pittard, Janet C"
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Record #:
11156
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Pittard describes parks in three of North Carolina's largest cities where residents can find a quiet space amid the hubbub of city life. They are Pullen Park (Raleigh), Freedom Park (Charlotte), and Center City Park (Greensboro).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p98-102, 104, 106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11266
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Public art is art not housed in a museum but found in the everyday environment, like paintings on buildings. The now-defunct Artworks for State Buildings Program was a state-supported program for public art. In 2001, Jeffrey York started Creating Places: A Community Public Art and Design Initiative. The program's objective is to pair community leaders and artists in an effort to develop projects for a specific community, such as the Fish Walk in Morehead City.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 2, July 2009, p90-92, 94-95, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9825
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The Carolina Ballet Company, founded in Raleigh in 1997, is now in its tenth year. The company has premiered over sixty ballets. Annual tours are made throughout North Carolina, and the ballet has toured in the People's Republic of China, Hungry, and New York City. The Carolina Ballet is recognized by many critics as one of the top ten ballet companies in the country.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 10, Mar 2008, p58-60, 62-63 Periodical Website
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Record #:
9883
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Almost two decades ago West Jefferson was a city in decline with empty storefronts and deteriorating buildings. Pittard discusses how the town has begun to revitalize itself, beginning with the transformation of a grave pit into BackStreet Park.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 11, Apr 2008, p84-86, 88-89, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10135
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Pittard discusses the life and work of David Stick, who is the leading authority on the people and events that shaped the Outer Banks over the last four hundred years. The author of a dozen books and numerous articles, Stick donated his personal library and archives to the North Carolina Office of Archives and History in 1986, to be maintained as a public research center. Located in Manteo, the Outer Banks History Center opened to the public in 1989.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 1, June 2008, p116-118, 120-122, 124, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10133
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For over four decades, the Order of the Longleaf Pine has recognized citizens' contributions to North Carolina or a community through career, civic, or individual effort. Past winners include Charles Kuralt, Charlie Daniels, Shirley Caesar, and Gaylord Perry.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 1, June 2008, p92-94, 96, 98, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10167
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Kevin Duffus, author, researcher, and filmmaker, discusses his latest book, The Last Days of Black Beard the Pirate.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 2, July 2008, p18-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10282
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The United Service Organization (USO) was formed on February 4, 1941, with a mission of serving the GIs who were away from home. The first USO in North Carolina opened in Fayetteville on October 13, 1941. The number would grow to around 300 centers before World War II ended. The Jacksonville USO is the state's largest, and it is the oldest continuously operating one in the world.
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Record #:
10278
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Pittard discusses the life of Shelby native Attie Texas Bostick. Born in 1875 into a deeply religious family, she went to China as a missionary in the first half of the 20th-century. There she faced famine, illness, war, and imprisonment by the Japanese.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 4, Sept 2008, p114-116, 118-120, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10414
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Sharon and Chris Smith and their two sons own and operate Mackey's Ferry Peanuts on Highway 64 near Jamesville. Whatever your favorite peanut taste--boiled, salted, right out of the shell, covered with chocolate, or peanut butter--visitors are sure to find it there. Besides peanuts, the store offers North Carolina products, crafts, and local barbecue. For many travelers to and from the Outer Banks, the store is a must stop.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 6, Nov 2008, p178-180, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10539
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Fred and Dot Wagoner have been in the Christmas tree business since 1939 and have developed a loyal following in Raleigh and Greensboro. Compared with other tree growers their sales are small, with around 2,500 trees a year harvested at their Fraser Knoll Farm in Ashe County.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 7, Dec 2008, p116-118, 120, 122, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8493
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North Carolina is one of the top ten states for cultural and heritage tourism. These tourists are interested in visiting historic sites and museums, attending concerts, shopping at farmers markets, and dining at the restaurants where the local people eat. Much of the state's heritage is found along a series of sixteen trails, such as the Art Road and Farmers Trail. The North Carolina Department of Commerce has twelve heritage tourism officers who help communities along the trails in highlighting material that is appropriate to their particular region. Pittard discusses a number of the trails and what they provide to the tourists.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 8, Jan 2007, p68-70, 72, 74-75, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8692
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In the early part of the 20th-century, fathers still taught sons how to run the farm, and few women worked outside the home. On Christmas Day in 1925, Ethel Turlington's husband died, leaving her a young widow with an infant daughter and the family farm in Johnston County. Pittard recounts the story of this determined woman who set an example for her daughter on how to survive and beat the odds. A self-taught farmer, Turlington used resourcefulness and frugality to provide for herself and her daughter, Hortense. She also worked as a bookkeeper for local businesses in Benson. As Hortense grew older, she entered into the farm routine, and at age 21, inherited two-thirds of the farm.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p116-118, 120, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8710
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Margaret Belva Mizelle was born in the town of Windsor in Bertie County in 1918. After graduating from nursing school in Charlotte in 1940, she worked as a private duty nurse. Before the outbreak of World War II, she joined the Army Nurse Corps and was assigned to the U.S. Army 38th Evacuation Hospital Unit. The unit went to England in the summer of 1942. In the fall of 1942, the 38th landed with the troops in Algeria and served in North Africa till September 1943. The 38th landed with the troops at Salerno in September 1943 and at Anzio, Italy in 1944. Mizelle recorded many of her experiences in letters now preserved in the North Carolina State Archives. After serving in Korea, she retired in 1970 with twenty-eight years of service and the rank of Lt. Colonel. Mizelle married Truman King in 1972. She died at the age of eighty-six in 2004.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p144-146, 148, 150-151, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8860
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Born and bred in the Carolinas, the shag has been the official popular dance of North Carolina since the 2005 Session of the General Assembly passed legislation to make it so. Pittard discusses the history of the dance which reportedly has been around since the 1920s. Both North Carolina and South Carolina share the dance and the music it helped bring about. Each state had its own bands, clubs, contests, national shag champions, and disc jockeys who helped spread the dance.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p94-96, 98, 100-101, il, por Periodical Website
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