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20 results for "Perry, Sarah"
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Record #:
21407
Abstract:
Perry describes the beginnings and growth of the John C. Campbell Folk School which was founded in 1925 by Olive Dame Campbell and named in honor of her husband. Located in Brasstown in Cherokee County, the school offers classes including blacksmithing, pottery, weaving, dyeing, knitting, and dulcimer instruction to over 5,500 students yearly.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 7, Dec 2013, p140-163, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
37889
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The place with distinction statewide and national began in 1891 as Women’s College. Known now as the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, its alumni have earned distinction as Pulitzer Prize winning historians, NASA astronomers, and acclaimed artists. Distinction earned from local sources came from alumni like Alice Irby. Information about Irby noted her marks of distinction such as involvement with the 1960 Woolworth’s sit-ins.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 8, Jan 2014, p54-58, 60, 62-63 Periodical Website
Record #:
20985
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During the Great Depression, the federal government purchased unused farmland in the Piedmont region. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy named this land the Uwharrie National Forest. It occupies parts of Montgomery, Randolph, and Davidson counties, and it is one of the nation's smallest national forest. It contains a mountain range older than the Rockies or Appalachians and lakes. Perry describes the forest and the people who live in and around it.
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Record #:
32916
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James Simpkins, b. in 1826 in TN, son of James Simpkins (b. 1787 in NC) and Mahala Moore (b. 1800 in SC); md. in 1846 to Elizabeth Neighbors; A. R. Biggs, b. in 1842 in NC, son of W. W. Biggs (b. 1817 in NC) and Matilda ____(b. 1818 in NC); md. Susie Jones; J. S. Eason, b. in 1836 in TN, son of Thomas Eason (b. 1798 in NC) and Ann M. _____. Thomas Eason was married three times and had thirteen children; B. Moore, b. in 1856 in TN, son of Alfred Moore, b. Dec. 6, 1811 in Pitt Co., NC; Columbus F. Dixon, in 1828 in TN, was one of seventeen children of John Dixon and Elizabeth Boyd, of NC.; m. Sarah A. Springer; Otis W. Scarborough, b. in 1849 in Miss., son of Isaac S. Scarborough (b. Edgecombe Co., NC) and Lucy G. Harrison (b. in VA); md. Cynthia E. Rimmer. Isaac S. Scarborough was the son of John Scarborough, b. NC, fought in Revolution; J. H. Williams, b. 1841 in TN, son of J. H. Williams (b. 1794 in NC) and Margaret Cason (b. 1802 in NC); md. S. C Owen; H. L. W. Hill, b. 1810, son of Henry J. A. Hill and Susannah Swales; md. Virginia A. Dearing. Henry J. A. Hill was born Feb. 7, 1774 in Edgecombe Co., NC, d. Aug. 21, 1825 in Warren Co., TN; E. H. Williams, b. in 1836 in Onslow Co., NC, one of seven children of N. W. Williams and E. N. Cox; md. 1) Fannie Cunningham; m.2) Janie Albritton; m.3) Nannie M. Finch; D. M. Tull, b. 1851 in TN, son of John Tull (b. 1806 in NC)and Jane A. Busick (b. 1815 in NC); md. Mrs. Mattie Crock; Martin Moore, b. 1819 in Pitt Co., NC, one of eight children of William Moore and Frances Forrest; md. Martha E. Sammons; Joseph B. Moore, b. 1837 in TN, one of eight children of John B. Moore and Martha E. Jones, both of Craven Co., NC; md. Mattie L. Coppedge; James W. E. Moore, b. TN, son of John Moore, of Bertie Co., NC; md. Mary M. Wood; Silas W. Bullock, b. 1851 in TN, son of Obediah Bullock and Penelope Nobles, of NC; m.1) ______; m.2) Dora Rushing; David A. Nunn, b. 1833 in TN, son of David Nunnand Alice Koonce, of NC; m.1) Mary E. Thompson; m.2) Tennessee Whitehead; Moses T. Moore, b. 1858 in TN, son of Needham Moore and Sophronia Cox; md. Elizabeth Cates. Needham Moore was born near Kinston, NC in 1822, d. Jan. 28, 1884; W. H. Eason, son of Stephen Moore and Rittie Trice; md. Beverly A. Allen. Stephen Moore was born in Dec. 1800 in Greene Co., NC, d. 1870; James H. Perry, b. 1833 in Martin Co., NC, one of fourteen children of N. Perry (1808-1858)and Millie Sewell (b. 1812), of NC; m.1) Penelope Brogden; m.2) C. A. Ellington; Joseph Milton Causey, b. 1864 in IN, son of David Bryant Causey and Margaret E. Cox; m.1) Laura Travers; m.2) Lois Wade. David Bryant Causey was a son of Hutson/Hudson Bryant Causey (1795-1872) of NC.
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Record #:
17789
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Central Piedmont Community College may not be the most likely place, but the school has built a program around film-making that is launching some impressive careers in advertising and movies.
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Record #:
17630
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Sharon Twiddy didn't plan to move to the Outer Banks or to restore old buildings and own real estate. However, thirty-five years ago her husband, Doug, convinced her that the coast was a great place to live. Among the places they have restored are the U.S. Life Saving Station, the Lewark-Gray House, and the Corolla School.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p32, 34, 36, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
19414
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Victoria Livengood grew up on a farm near Thomasville. She began her education at UNC-Chapel Hill in pre-law, but after a course in choir, her professor convinced her to switch her major to voice. She later won the Metropolitan Opera auditions and began her career as an international opera star.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 11, Apr 2013, p22, 24-25, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17628
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In the 1960s, Robert Hart, a Hickory physician and preservationist, purchased 200 acres outside the city limits. There he collected ninety-two buildings from Catawba and surrounding counties and created a place that imitates village life. With the help of his wife, he decorates the buildings with furniture from the time period in which they were built.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p20, 22, 24, 26, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20818
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Perry recounts how two deep sea divers and underwater welders, Tim Ferris and Bob Weihe, started The Blue Ridge Distilling Company, located twenty miles south of Morganton, and are revolutionizing the way whisky is made.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p176-180, 182, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17771
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A new exhibit at Cameron Art Museum in Wilmington uses spools of thread from abandoned mills to highlight North Carolina's textile industry.
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Record #:
17629
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Those buried at St. Philips Church in Old Salem are remembered with a 12-foot hunk of red granite on which are listed the 131 names or parts of names of those buried there. The cemetery had been forgotten until the 1990s when it was discovered by archeologists who excavated and identified the graves.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p28, 30-30, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
18716
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Pittsboro, county seat of Chatham County, is featured in Our State Magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. One thing that makes Pittsboro distinctive is that it has its own currency. Places to visit there include the Carolina Tiger Rescue, Starlight Mead, the Oak Leaf Restaurant, Circle City Books & Music, and The Woodwright's School and Tool Shop. Owner Roy Underhill is known by everyone and he is featured on his PBS show.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 9, Feb 2013, p32-34, 36, 38-40, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21784
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Charleen Swansea graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1956, taught there for one year, then at Queens College in Charlotte until 1964. She was fired from the college for being \"too courageously creative.\" She and her students then formed a writing group and created the Red Clay Reader, a magazine for writers with deep roots in the Southern soil. It had a run of seven years. She then founded her own publishing company, Red Clay Publishers, which has printed 32 books by Southern writers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p36, 38-39, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
20858
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Shelby, located in Cleveland County, is featured in Our State magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. Among the things not to miss while visiting are the Owl's Eye Vineyard and Winery, Buffalo Creek Gallery, the Carousel and Rotary Train at City Park, NiFen Dining, and the Lily Bean Coffee Shop.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 4, Sept 2013, p40-42, 44, 46, 48, 50, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17030
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Chip Holton has created sketches, landscapes, watercolors, portraits, murals and sculptures and had built houses and designed buildings. Twenty years ago he met Dennis Quaintance, an hotelier from Greensboro who owned the Proximity Hotel and the O. Henry Hotel. When he was building the Proximity in 2006, Quaintance hired him to do all the artwork for the rooms--500 works of art--to be finished by summer's end. When he finished, Holton was hired to paint for the O. Henry and given the title Artist-in-Residence. To date, he has completed over 800 works of art for Quaintance.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 3, Aug 2012, p19-21, il, por Periodical Website
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