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21 results for "Paysour, Conrad"
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Record #:
7749
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Freedom Hill Wesleyan Church was built in 1848 near Snow Camp, when it was part of Chatham County. Freedom Hill was the first Wesleyan Methodist Church in the South. The people of Snow Camp harassed the church with musket fire because of its anti-slavery doctrine. Twelve bullet scars from are still on the doors of the church. The Wesleyan's remained steadfast in their beliefs. The church was moved to the Wesleyan Camp Grounds in Colfax, in western Guilford County in 1976.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p21, 38, il
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Record #:
8069
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In 1881, at only eight years old, T. Gilbert Pearson traded his bird egg collection to Guilford College for tuition to attend preparatory school. He had seen mass killings of birds in Florida, which fueled his outrage at the practice of killing birds to obtain their plumage for the women's hat industry. In 1895, Pearson, along with the Women's Temperance Union of North Carolina, produced a leaflet urging women to stop buying hats adorned with bird feathers. His conviction never waned, and in 1902 he formed the North Carolina Audubon Society, which joined the cause. Pearson tirelessly lobbied the legislature, incurring much outside opposition and scorn, until 1903 when a bill was passed to give the Audubon Society power to appoint game wardens and collect fees from out-of-state sportsmen who came here to hunt. In 1911 the state took over the appointments and fees and outlawed market hunting completely. Before his death in 1943, Pearson helped enact several conservation laws and even claimed worldwide notoriety.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 53 Issue 4, Sept 1985, p9-10, 37, por
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Record #:
8148
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Harlan Hall is supervising biologist at the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission's Caswell County Game Lands that includes a forty-acre rehabilitation center that provides a place where wild animals are prepared for return to the wild.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Aug 1984, p2, por
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Record #:
8459
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Garland Stout, a retired engineer, began making maps after researching his wife's Randolph County ancestors. Since then, Stout has drawn over 3,000 maps that include drawings of all 100 North Carolina counties. Stout's maps include old family residences, old churches, deserted towns with the dates they were incorporated, and abandoned roads. Stout is also a highly respected genealogist and is considered an expert in North Carolina post office history. Stout is currently trying to locate, by present county boundaries, the locations of original North Carolina land patents and land grants. He has completed sixty percent of the project to date.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p15, por
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Record #:
8508
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The North Carolina School of Horseshoeing is located in Guilford County and is one of only six horseshoeing schools in the United States. The school lasts for two months, as students learn the proper way to approach a horse, how to hold its legs without endangering the horse or themselves, how to make right and left shoes, and how to hammer in nails. The school's emphasis is on safety for both the horse and horseshoer. Even though the training is difficult, few students drop out of the school. Graduates of the horseshoe school earn an average of around $20,000 a year as horseshoers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p23-24, por
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Record #:
8708
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Charles W. Wardell of Trinity, 61, is one of the nation's top six doorknob collectors. In the old days, people were particular about what doorknob to use on their front doors, and it is these antique doorknobs that Wardell collects. Not many have been manufactured since World War II. They can usually be found at flea markets, antique stores, and at sites where buildings are going to be torn down.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Feb 1982, p21-22, il
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Record #:
8629
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Van Sataaldiunen was nine years old when his family left Holland in 1939, just before the outbreak of World War II. Unable to come immediately to the United States, they lived in Canada first before coming to Beaufort County. Beaufort and Hyde Counties have sizeable Dutch colonies. Van Staalduinen farms 600 acres in Beaufort County, with about a third of it devoted to tulip raising. Other flowers include daffodils, peonies, irises, and hyacinths. Most of his flowers are sold in North Carolina and neighboring states. It is an uncertain business, subject to the whims of nature, blight, and tax laws. His tulip farm is the last of its kind in area which once supported thirty such farms.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 5, May 1981, p18-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
9298
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Guilford College Fire Chief Bob Wilson has developed a system to get water from privately owned lakes and ponds to fires more quickly. Now, with hydrants set up at all private lakes and ponds, pumper trucks connect to the hydrant, fill their tanker, and go to the nearby fires.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p19, por
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Record #:
9027
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Burlington Industries Inc. of Greensboro makes over seventy-five different types of fabric, none of which are used for apparel. Among them are fabrics used in typewriters, tires, snow fencing, flags, and even parts of blimps. Although some of the fabrics are bullet resistant and used in police vests, the material is not bullet proof and company officials shy from saying that it is.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 9, Feb 1979, p22-23, 29, il
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Record #:
9170
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The Southern Railway train depot in Greensboro is under a one-year lease with the Carolina Midland Railway. Tom Tedford, an English teacher at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, is president of Carolina Midland, a model railroad club. Most members are adults, some of whom own thousands of dollars worth of equipment.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 8, Jan 1977, p17, il
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Record #:
10770
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B. J. Gregson founded Gregson Manufacturing Company, located in Liberty, in 1921, and the business remains family-owned. The company is one of the country's four or five leading manufacturers of wood institutional seating, which is used by hotels, hospitals, governmental agencies, offices, schools, and libraries. The product is sold in all fifty states.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 4, July 1968, p11, 22, il
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Record #:
10954
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When women stopped wearing full fashioned hosiery in the mid-50s, the future did not look promising for hosiery-maker Eugene Moffitt and the Moffitt Knitting Mills of Asheboro. However, the company began making Banlon sports shirts and prospects improved. The company began in 1946 with one plant covering 6,000-square-feet of floor space and today has four plants with over 25,000-square-feet.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 21, Apr 1968, p15, il
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Record #:
10756
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A. A. Brame founded Brame Textile Machinery Company in North Carolina in 1951. Brame built the company with his life savings and spent three years developing it before the company began to grow. The company makes missile parts, furniture hardware, and everyday machine parts.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 16, Jan 1967, p15-16, il
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Record #:
10794
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W. Roger Soles is the president of Jefferson Standard Life Insurance. Soles, a Columbus County native, graduated high school early and enlisted in the army during World War II. After the war, Soles attended the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill as a business major. His interest in accounts and stocks drew the attention of George Cavenaugh, president of Jefferson Standard, who hired Soles after college.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 23, May 1967, p13,18, por
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Record #:
10398
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Ruziski is the largest book binder in the southeastern United States and a storied company located in Greensboro, N.C. Ruziski started in eastern Europe in 1758 but transferred to North Carolina and built a plant for restoration or binding. Ruziski varies in customers and charges but the work remains similar to its original requirements. The company has even opened another plant in Baltimore as the business thrives.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 13, Dec 1966, p11, 29, il
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