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21 results for "Paysour, Conrad"
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Record #:
8508
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The North Carolina School of Horseshoeing is located in Guilford County and is one of only six horseshoeing schools in the United States. The school lasts for two months, as students learn the proper way to approach a horse, how to hold its legs without endangering the horse or themselves, how to make right and left shoes, and how to hammer in nails. The school's emphasis is on safety for both the horse and horseshoer. Even though the training is difficult, few students drop out of the school. Graduates of the horseshoe school earn an average of around $20,000 a year as horseshoers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p23-24, por
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Record #:
10398
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Ruziski is the largest book binder in the southeastern United States and a storied company located in Greensboro, N.C. Ruziski started in eastern Europe in 1758 but transferred to North Carolina and built a plant for restoration or binding. Ruziski varies in customers and charges but the work remains similar to its original requirements. The company has even opened another plant in Baltimore as the business thrives.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 13, Dec 1966, p11, 29, il
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Record #:
10756
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A. A. Brame founded Brame Textile Machinery Company in North Carolina in 1951. Brame built the company with his life savings and spent three years developing it before the company began to grow. The company makes missile parts, furniture hardware, and everyday machine parts.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 16, Jan 1967, p15-16, il
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Record #:
12665
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John Foard, president of Kluttz rings of Gastonia, likely knows more about 12-pound Gun-Howitzers than many Confederate and Union soldiers who used them during the Civil War. An old artilleryman himself, Foard has specialized in the study of weapons used during the Civil War. Foard's research included trips to battlefields, as well as obtaining information on the gun from French archives.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p11, por
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Record #:
8629
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Van Sataaldiunen was nine years old when his family left Holland in 1939, just before the outbreak of World War II. Unable to come immediately to the United States, they lived in Canada first before coming to Beaufort County. Beaufort and Hyde Counties have sizeable Dutch colonies. Van Staalduinen farms 600 acres in Beaufort County, with about a third of it devoted to tulip raising. Other flowers include daffodils, peonies, irises, and hyacinths. Most of his flowers are sold in North Carolina and neighboring states. It is an uncertain business, subject to the whims of nature, blight, and tax laws. His tulip farm is the last of its kind in area which once supported thirty such farms.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 5, May 1981, p18-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
12798
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First suggested after a bank robber escaped from the Guilford County Jail and held up four teenagers at gunpoint, use of dogs within the police force became a recurrent topic. Further initiated by Mayor George Roach, bloodhounds were procured for Greensboro and immediately put to use, successfully tracking two burglars and an automobile thief shortly after their arrival. A progressive move for Greensboro, police dogs will increase the capacity for tracking lost or kidnapped children, disoriented elderly persons, as well as fleeing offenders.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 4, July 1960, p9, 16, il
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Record #:
10770
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B. J. Gregson founded Gregson Manufacturing Company, located in Liberty, in 1921, and the business remains family-owned. The company is one of the country's four or five leading manufacturers of wood institutional seating, which is used by hotels, hospitals, governmental agencies, offices, schools, and libraries. The product is sold in all fifty states.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 4, July 1968, p11, 22, il
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Record #:
9027
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Burlington Industries Inc. of Greensboro makes over seventy-five different types of fabric, none of which are used for apparel. Among them are fabrics used in typewriters, tires, snow fencing, flags, and even parts of blimps. Although some of the fabrics are bullet resistant and used in police vests, the material is not bullet proof and company officials shy from saying that it is.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 9, Feb 1979, p22-23, 29, il
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Record #:
8708
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Charles W. Wardell of Trinity, 61, is one of the nation's top six doorknob collectors. In the old days, people were particular about what doorknob to use on their front doors, and it is these antique doorknobs that Wardell collects. Not many have been manufactured since World War II. They can usually be found at flea markets, antique stores, and at sites where buildings are going to be torn down.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Feb 1982, p21-22, il
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Record #:
10794
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W. Roger Soles is the president of Jefferson Standard Life Insurance. Soles, a Columbus County native, graduated high school early and enlisted in the army during World War II. After the war, Soles attended the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill as a business major. His interest in accounts and stocks drew the attention of George Cavenaugh, president of Jefferson Standard, who hired Soles after college.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 23, May 1967, p13,18, por
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Record #:
13448
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James A. Hendley of Stanley is an inventor and manufacturer, holding 40 patents, including those on a machine gun belt and armored vest used during World War II. Beginning his career at 14 years old as a textile worker in Connecticut, Hedley moved to the textile firm Talon in Stanley in the 1950s.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 12, Nov 1961, p11, 14, por
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Record #:
12700
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McCurry & Byrd Hosiery Mill of Lincolntown is a successful, if not unorthodox, operation whose ability to make products from salvaged material has given them a reputation as \"buzzards.\" Making men's socks from the inexpensive left-over yarn from other hosiery mills, McCurry and Byrd found a way to weave a quality product at a reduced price.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 24, Apr 1962, p19, 27, por
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Record #:
12942
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North Carolina workers are changing the way they handle patients with mental disabilities. In addition to the four mental hospitals and the three training schools established for mentally defective children, the state has augmented the corresponding budget as well as abolished hospital waiting lists for afflicted patients.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 21, Mar 1958, p15-16, il
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Record #:
8069
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In 1881, at only eight years old, T. Gilbert Pearson traded his bird egg collection to Guilford College for tuition to attend preparatory school. He had seen mass killings of birds in Florida, which fueled his outrage at the practice of killing birds to obtain their plumage for the women's hat industry. In 1895, Pearson, along with the Women's Temperance Union of North Carolina, produced a leaflet urging women to stop buying hats adorned with bird feathers. His conviction never waned, and in 1902 he formed the North Carolina Audubon Society, which joined the cause. Pearson tirelessly lobbied the legislature, incurring much outside opposition and scorn, until 1903 when a bill was passed to give the Audubon Society power to appoint game wardens and collect fees from out-of-state sportsmen who came here to hunt. In 1911 the state took over the appointments and fees and outlawed market hunting completely. Before his death in 1943, Pearson helped enact several conservation laws and even claimed worldwide notoriety.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 53 Issue 4, Sept 1985, p9-10, 37, por
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Record #:
11280
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O. F. Stafford is president of Pilot Life Insurance Company of Greensboro. He has been with the company for forty-five years, and Paysour describes his rise through the ranks to become company president.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 6, Aug 1965, p16, por
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