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23 results for "Owen, Guy"
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Record #:
35622
Author(s):
Abstract:
Owen’s return to his hometown revealed little had changed during his years away in college working on a Bachelor’s degree and present work with a Master’s. One illustration was daily activity at the local general store. As he discovered, it was still a site for yarns, but not of the sewing circle sort: it was the creative license a narrator used to stitch together a tale.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Aug 1977, p33-36
Record #:
35688
Author(s):
Abstract:
The golden weed was tobacco, part of a scam that went down in history. It was memorable partly because of the unexpected co-conspirators for the shady sale of the tainted tobacco: two men passing themselves off as reverends.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p38-43
Subject(s):
Record #:
35751
Author(s):
Abstract:
References to Hoover revealed time (the Great Depression). Details such as the favorite pastime of the main character’s father (cockfighting) betrayed the setting (a family farm in a small town). These details make the story, dedicated to Erskine Caldwell, seem unrelatable for modern, urban audiences. The conflict between the main character’s parents on how to assure that he (Wesley) becomes a decent adult, however, may be perceived as a timeless issue.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p25-26, 37, 55
Record #:
35749
Author(s):
Abstract:
Olive’s analysis of how crimes were handled in the US during the nineteenth century revealed that standards were more different than similar. For example, the punishment for blasphemy was jail time and a fine. The punishment for being a common scold (or nagging woman) was placement on a ducking stool and plunging into water. Such punishments revealed that socio-cultural standards were much stricter as well as often double standard.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p14-15
Record #:
35778
Author(s):
Abstract:
An encounter on a train with a stranger left him the owner of a coat seemingly tailored for him and a pocketful of dollars that seemed like pennies from heaven. From that meeting and gifts, Owen was taught this lesson: the best gifts aren’t always wrapped up in a box and bow.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p31-32, 56
Record #:
35849
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of classic authors NC could claim as its own, only O. Henry and Thomas Wolfe the author offered. As for current ones, Owen offered a much longer list of native sons and daughters, many still residing in the Tar Heel State. Among them were Ann Tyler, Fred Chappell, and Doris Betts.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p9, 52
Record #:
35907
Author(s):
Abstract:
Spotlighted was a famous NC author in the running for a commemorative stamp and his most famous work, Look Homeward, Angel. Or at least in writing—play and screenplay—was the novel still renowned. As the author revealed, the best known work produced by this native son has experienced a sales decline since WWII. The best evidence for Wolfe readership’s decrease to Owen, though, was in the dearth of college students familiar with Wolfe works.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p14
Record #:
35274
Abstract:
An overview of Blowing Rock Craft Fair, which hosted a wide array of folk artisans. The author described the setting and some of the participants.