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23 results for "Owen, Guy"
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Record #:
8892
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North Carolinians speak a peculiar mix of southern and folk. The Tar Heel language, a reflection of a rural past, is dying under the growth of the New South. Guy Owen, however, is working to record the Tar Heel language through his writing. An author of several books, Owen sets his stories in rural North Carolina and includes old-time folk sayings. The Duke University Press is also preserving North Carolina's linguistic heritage in its Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore. Included in the article are many of the typical Tar Heel folk sayings.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p5-6, por
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Record #:
8979
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In the mid-twenties, Erskine Caldwell began writing book reviews for THE CHARLOTTE OBSERVER. Caldwell's best-selling book, TOBACCO ROAD, was heavily influenced by his time spent in North Carolina. Although Caldwell now lives in Arizona and Montana, NC State University recently received a collection of his unpublished manuscripts which graduate students are now working with.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 6, Nov 1980, p19-20, 35, il, por
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Record #:
35849
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Of classic authors NC could claim as its own, only O. Henry and Thomas Wolfe the author offered. As for current ones, Owen offered a much longer list of native sons and daughters, many still residing in the Tar Heel State. Among them were Ann Tyler, Fred Chappell, and Doris Betts.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p9, 52
Record #:
35907
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Spotlighted was a famous NC author in the running for a commemorative stamp and his most famous work, Look Homeward, Angel. Or at least in writing—play and screenplay—was the novel still renowned. As the author revealed, the best known work produced by this native son has experienced a sales decline since WWII. The best evidence for Wolfe readership’s decrease to Owen, though, was in the dearth of college students familiar with Wolfe works.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p14
Record #:
9025
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William Faulkner arrived in Chapel Hill on October 31, 1931 and stayed until the 3rd of November. He gave a talk in Chapel Hill but no one kept notes. His visit did, however, result in the publication of nine of his poems and a short story in an issue of CONTEMPO, a Tar Heel magazine.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 9, Feb 1979, p16-17, il, por
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Record #:
9057
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Novelist James Byrd's mansion in Southern Pines, known as Weymouth, was recently purchased by a group of restoration enthusiasts. Environmentalists, naturalists, and literary organizations have all lent support to the restoration project. Upon completion, a committee of writers will selects prominent poets and writers to be awarded Weymouth Fellowships and attend retreats at the mansion.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p18-19, il, por
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Record #:
16353
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When Erskine Caldwell published his first full-length novel in 1932, he was soon launched as one of the South's most widely read novelists and storytellers. He reached his peak in the late 1930s and 40s, declining after World War II. Now, he almost totally neglected by students of American literature. In the 1940s William Faulkner ranked Caldwell, along with Thomas Wolfe, among the greatest 20th-century American novelists, and was considered for the Nobel Prize for literature. Studded throughout his stories and non-fiction is the recurring theme of folklore, most learned from the African Americans and farm hands he work with as a youth.
Record #:
35751
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References to Hoover revealed time (the Great Depression). Details such as the favorite pastime of the main character’s father (cockfighting) betrayed the setting (a family farm in a small town). These details make the story, dedicated to Erskine Caldwell, seem unrelatable for modern, urban audiences. The conflict between the main character’s parents on how to assure that he (Wesley) becomes a decent adult, however, may be perceived as a timeless issue.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p25-26, 37, 55
Record #:
35749
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Olive’s analysis of how crimes were handled in the US during the nineteenth century revealed that standards were more different than similar. For example, the punishment for blasphemy was jail time and a fine. The punishment for being a common scold (or nagging woman) was placement on a ducking stool and plunging into water. Such punishments revealed that socio-cultural standards were much stricter as well as often double standard.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p14-15
Record #:
35778
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An encounter on a train with a stranger left him the owner of a coat seemingly tailored for him and a pocketful of dollars that seemed like pennies from heaven. From that meeting and gifts, Owen was taught this lesson: the best gifts aren’t always wrapped up in a box and bow.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p31-32, 56
Record #:
9034
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Owen re-tells a tale told by 78-year-old musician Thomas Burt during the North Carolina Folklife Festival at Eno State Park in Durham last July. Burt rarely performs publicly, and the story is about a guitar picker named Scrap Harris who makes an unfortunate deal with the devil.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978, p19-20, il
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Record #:
35688
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The golden weed was tobacco, part of a scam that went down in history. It was memorable partly because of the unexpected co-conspirators for the shady sale of the tainted tobacco: two men passing themselves off as reverends.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p38-43
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Record #:
35622
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Owen’s return to his hometown revealed little had changed during his years away in college working on a Bachelor’s degree and present work with a Master’s. One illustration was daily activity at the local general store. As he discovered, it was still a site for yarns, but not of the sewing circle sort: it was the creative license a narrator used to stitch together a tale.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Aug 1977, p33-36
Record #:
9113
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Thomas Wolfe went to England in 1924, the first of four extended trips he made there. Most of his LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL was written in London and Oxford, and since the publishing of his journals in 1970, it is now possible to follow his trek through England. While in Chelsea, Wolfe often wrote 3,000 words a day of his novel. In 1927, Wolfe tired of England and went to Germany which he much preferred.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p17-18, il
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Record #:
12253
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Robert Frost's last ambitious poem \"Kitty Hawk\" alludes to his first visit to North Carolina. Having recently been rejected by Elinor White, 18 year old Frost walked from Norfolk to Dismal Swamp where he intended to commit suicide. For over sixty years, the famed poet guarded the truth about his painful confrontation about death.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 10, Mar 1975, p14-15, il
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