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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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60 results for "Kelly, Susan Stafford"
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Record #:
24746
Abstract:
Starlight Café in Greenville serves high quality food and supports the farm to table concept. Most of the food served at Starlight Café is grown and raised at Starlight Farm and Gardens while additional food comes from nearby towns such a La Grange, Goldsboro, and Snow Hill.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 7, December 2015, p50, 52-53, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
28493
Abstract:
The Atlantic Beach Seafood & Fresh Market’s success as a 3rd generation family business is described. The Kamile and Chandler Willis met at the restaurant, married, and now are taking control of the successful Atlantic Beach institution. Stories of the family, the couple, and the family business are told.
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Record #:
28491
Abstract:
Once a stagecoach stop, Washburn’s General Store in Rutherford County is where the locals eat lunch and orders come in from around the world. The history of the general store and its owners are detailed. The store has been in the family for five generations and remains a pillar of the local community.
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Record #:
24067
Abstract:
Navitat Canopy Adventures in Barnardsville, North Carolina offers visitors two-hour canopy tours over the wilderness of Buncombe County. The zip line-based tours provide spectacular views of the Blue Ridge and thrills for the adventurer.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 5, October 2015, p186-188, 190, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
22790
Abstract:
Richard Ritter, from Bakersville, North Carolina, is a renowned glassblower and one of nineteen individuals to be named a North Carolina Living Treasure. He describes the tedious process of glassblowing and introduces a number of tools used in glass artistry.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 8, January 2015, p112-114, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26732
Abstract:
The Grimes Plantation is one of the oldest properties in Pitt County and it was named for Confederate general Bryan Grimes who became a prominent farmer in Pitt County after the Civil War. Eddie Smith, a native of Lexington, has restored Grimesland Plantation to its original painting and details.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 3, August 2016, p82-101, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
36959
Abstract:
A companion to “Hole in the Wall Joints: Tried and True,” this article profiled nine restaurants located in towns stretching from the coast to the mountains and whose menus range from seafood to snacks. Local spots that became the hearts of their towns included Waterfront Seafood Shack, Kitty Hawk; Allen and Son, Chapel Hill; and Dots Dario, Marion.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 3, August 2017, p90-94, 96, 98, 100-102, 104, 106, 108, 110-114 Periodical Website
Record #:
29156
Abstract:
In the height of textile production in the 1940s, company towns--towns within towns--housed thousands of workers and their families. For many of the children that grew up in Cone Mill Villages, White Oak, or Proximity Print Works, the experiences within these mill villages offer sweet memories.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p156-158, 160, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34945
Abstract:
In the mid-1900’s, mill villages became popular as a means to house and provide resources for families working at the textile mills. One mill village child, Judith Sams, recalls how the village she lived in, White Oak, became a self-sustaining town. White Oak ran on the mill schedule and created convenience stores and churches for everyone to attend.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p156-160, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
24263
Abstract:
Gabe Bratton owns and operates Gabrielle Handmade Jewelry in Raleigh. As a metal works artist, she specializes in jewelry made with lace. She creates bracelets, necklaces, rings, and earrings from table clothes, wedding dresses, or veils, among other garments.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 3, August 2015, p126-132, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24065
Abstract:
Linville Gorge is known for its breathtaking views and rugged terrain. A waterfall rushes at the bottom of the gorge, a site that the author highly recommends for all adventurers who like to explore the unbeaten path.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 5, October 2015, p136-138, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
28550
Abstract:
The history of post-mills in North Carolina and the location of a replica post mill in Dare County are detailed. Post-mills were common along the Outer Banks during the 18th and 19th centuries in Carteret, Hyde, and Dare counties. In the 1970s Lynanne Wescott built a replica post-mill located at Island Farm on Roanoke Island and it has become a local landmark.
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Record #:
34901
Abstract:
Windmills used to be a common site in the Outer Banks of North Carolina until the early 20th century. In the 1970’s, one woman set out to build an exact replica using the same techniques as those from the 18th- and 19th centuries and set it up in Nags Head. It has since been restored and moved to Island Farm on Roanoke Island.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2017, p152-156, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24261
Abstract:
Dolly Madison, wife of President James Madison, was born in Guilford County, North Carolina. She was a known entertainer, but the origin of her red velvet dress remains a mystery for historians and curators. Some speculate that this dress may be made from the white house curtains, while others think it may have been a separate purchase, The dress has been on display in the National Portrait Gallery and in the Smithsonian, but today it resides in the Greensboro Historical Museum.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 3, August 2015, p108-110, 112, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
21668
Abstract:
Kelly recounts the early days of telephoning in North Carolina when a person picked up the phone and the operator said, \"Number please.\"
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p40-42, 44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
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