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9 results for "Jones, Mark D"
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Record #:
18567
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The decline of quail throughout their range is widespread, and it's a big problem that does not come with easy answers. The required habitat changes are expensive and difficult to achieve because changes would impact large acreages of mostly privately owned lands. Without enough habitat to reverse the trend, hunters have proposed other solutions to the decline.
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Record #:
18568
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Research conducted at the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission's Southeastern Focal Area (SEFA) shows that quail populations can be improved with proper wildlife management given enough land, time, and financial commitment from landowners.
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Record #:
15807
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The past one hundred years has seen the restoration of a number of animals in North Carolina, including the white-tailed deer, wild turkeys, and black bears. They are now thriving in the state and across the nation. However there is one species that has not held its own--the bobwhite quail. Throughout its range the numbers of this game bird continue to decline. Wildlife managers have yet to determine why.
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Record #:
17753
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In part two of this article continued from the January/February issue, Jones discusses more of the problems facing the bobwhite quail in North Carolina. This article focuses on proposed solutions for preventing further decline.
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Record #:
17416
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Many predators eat quail. Ants, deer, hawks, and owls are included among the forty species that do. This, added to loss of habitat quality and quantity, contribute to the decline in the quail population. Jones examines possible solutions to the problem.
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Record #:
7659
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North Carolina's wild pig population is increasing and expanding. The state's history of wild pigs began in 1912 with the introduction of European pigs into Graham County for hunting purposes. Many of them escaped from the holding areas and into the mountains. Later they reached the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. As the pigs are a threat to native wildlife and habitat both inside and outside the park, the National Park Service began a removal program in 1977. To date, nearly 10,000 pigs have been shot or removed, but park officials admit the problem is still there. The danger of the wild pigs' expansion to the counties of eastern North Carolina is that they could bring disease which could devastate the pork industry.
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Record #:
6058
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With better education of the public about black bears and careful wildlife management, the bear population in the state is at an all-time high. Around 7,000 bears live in the Coastal Plain, with another 4,000 in the mountain regions. Jones discuses the black bear population in North Carolina from colonial times, the bears' restoration and territorial expansion, and their outlook for the future.
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Record #:
16437
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One of the state's noblest traditions--quail hunting--is in danger of extinction. Prior to the 1970s, more than 175,000 hunters came to the state and harvested between 2.2 and 2.8 million quail. During the 1995 season only 28,000 hunters harvested 225,000 quail. Jones discusses reasons for the decline and whether it can be reversed. In the state quail are declining at 6.2 percent per year from 1982 to 1991.
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Record #:
16436
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The habitat of the fox squirrel, the larger and more colorful relative of the gray squirrel, has declined in the Southeastern Coastal Plain through unrestricted logging and a lack of controlled burning. Jones reports on a restoration project to begin at Cherry Point during January and February, 1997.
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