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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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38 results for "Jenkins, Jay"
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Record #:
11916
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Transitioning from a regional to a national university, Duke University is currently undergoing major renovations. Outside of spending over $11.2 million dollars on new buildings and an additional $1.2 million on the first purpose built oceanographic research vessel ever constructed in the United States, Duke has a new president. Replacing Dr. Deryl Hart, Dr. Douglas Maitland Knight, will work on continuing to expand the facilities of the Duke complex, propelling the university into competition with institutions such as Yale, Harvard, and Princeton.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 13, Nov 1963, p15, 28, il, por
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Record #:
39386
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Andy Jenkins and his son, Lance Jenkins, with brothers and friends, make up a gospel musical group in Jackson, Northampton County, NC. They perform about 40 gospel concerts a year in area churches and for fundraisers.
Record #:
39424
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The article is about the old ways to make butter. Pat Sawyer of Hope Plantation demonstrates how to do it.
Record #:
23290
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The Chowan River begins in Franklin, VA and is one of the major freshwater contributors to the Albemarle Sound.
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Record #:
23296
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The late Dr. Joe Fleetwood travelled to Antarctica in 1955 to take part in the last expedition to the South Pole.
Record #:
24855
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The Aurora Fossil Museum in Beaufort County is one of the last non-admission museums in the state and last year, had at least one visitor from every state. The recent addition the PotashCorp Mine Room is hoped to attract even more visitors to the museum and the local Fossil Festival held annually in May. This year the museum will be raffling off a megalodon shark tooth to support the festival.
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Record #:
39423
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This article features sisters, Dixie Stanley and Gen Stanley Harrell, daughters of Dr. John Stanley and his wife, Neva, of Woodland, NC. The sisters do beautiful tatting, crocheting and knitting.
Record #:
24427
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The Gallery Theatre in Ashokie, North Carolina celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. The history of the theatre began with the Richards Theatre—the former name of the theatre—which closed in the 1950s. Beginning in 1965, a group set out to revive the theatre, resulting in the opening of the Gallery Theatre in 1966. The theatre has since become a staple of Ashokie culture.
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Record #:
11576
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Important in facilitating the role of Governor throughout American political history, this article acknowledges 9 of the 15 male secretaries to the North Carolina governor between 1917 through 1964. General background information, dates of appointment, and subsequent positions held are included.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 1, June 1964, p13, 64, por
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Record #:
23137
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Built in the 1730s, Person's Ordinary served as a tavern and a stagecoach station in Littleton, North Carolina. Local efforts by the Littleton Woman's Club led to the site's preservation and today visitors can visit this historic site.
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Record #:
39408
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Branch Grove, the birthplace of Alpheus Branch, founder of BB&T, is an extremely fine 1820's Federal tripartite house (with an earlier 1790s Georgian wing). Placed on the National Register in 1982, the highly significant house was rented to tenants from the 1880s to the early 1980s and sat vacant for decades. Preservation NC marketed the house for eleven years with lots of interest, but the challenge was always finding a suitable new site. In 2016, we faced a final ultimatum: move it or it will be burned down. The stars finally aligned with available land, and at the final hour, PNC received an extremely generous anonymous donation to relocate the house and stabilize its exterior. PNC was fortunate to partner with local contractor Andrus & Company on the renovation. The house was moved to a nearby site of over 38 acres and Preservation NC is looking for a buyer.
Record #:
8904
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Robert Lee Humber successfully lobbied $1,000,000 from the North Carolina legislature in 1947. Humber had obtained a promise from the Kress Foundation in New York that they would match the legislature up to $1,000,000 in purchasing art. Humber lobbied legislatures into passing a bill that stipulated that if money was left over at the end of the year that money would be used for matching the Kress Foundation. The funds were matched and the North Carolina Museum of Art now exists because of Humber's efforts. Article is reprinted from the January 12, 1957 issue.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p49-50, por
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Record #:
12157
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Robert Lee Humber convinced the State of North Carolina, as well as the Kress Foundation in New York City, to each donate $1 million dollars to the N.C. Museum of Art for purchasing new art.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 17, Jan 1957, p7, il, por
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Record #:
12790
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Previously an insurance salesmen from Chapel Hill, John Wesley Umstead, Jr. shifted trades after the loss of a son in 1944, becoming one of the most influential people of North Carolina in the field of mental health. Appointed to the State Hospitals Board of Control, as overseer of mental hospitals in 1945, Umstead is noted as being responsible for the emergence of North Carolina as one of the premier locations for the treatment of mental health problems nationwide.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 25, May 1963, p9-10, por
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Record #:
11154
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North Carolina has worked hard to keep its rivers clean. Earle C. Hubbard, director of the Division of Stream Sanitation and Hydrology talks about the cleanliness of local water. Hubbard noted that a majority of the streams are classified as pure or clean enough to require minimal chemical changes for everyday use. The abundant water resources in the 16 river basins of North Carolina require constant attention to prevent polluters from damaging the water.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 10, Oct 1966, p19, 25, por
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