NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


49 results for "Gray, Tim"
Currently viewing results 16 - 30
Previous
PAGE OF 4
Next
Record #:
5844
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Griffin, Jr. is vice-president of the family business, D. H. Griffin Wrecking. The company is the Southeast's largest and the country's third-largest wrecking company. Gray discusses the work of Griffin and the company at the clean-up of the World Trade Center in New York.
Record #:
6207
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cheer Ltd. is BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine's 2003 North Carolina Small Business of the Year. The company, founded by Gwen Holtsclaw in Fayetteville in 1988, employs ten and plans and holds cheerleading camps, competitions, and coaching clinics. Cheer Ltd. also sells cheerleading merchandise. Revenue projections for 2003 are $2.5 million.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 23 Issue 12, Dec 2003, p30-32, 34, 36, 38, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
5334
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham-based Cree Inc. is a runner-up in BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA's High-Tech Company of the Year competition. Cree, founded in 1987, makes high-tech products, such as its light-emitting diodes. The company employs 940 and had revenues of $177 million in fiscal 2001.
Record #:
5336
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham-based Red Hat Inc. is a runner-up in BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA's High-Tech Company of the Year competition. Red Hat Inc., founded in 1993, is a maker of computer software and employs 600.
Record #:
5335
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charlotte-based Digital Optics Corp. is a runner-up in BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA's High-Tech Company of the Year competition. Digital Optics, founded in 1991, makes high-tech products, such as its photonic chip. The company employs 115.
Record #:
5479
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cary-based SAS Institute Inc. is BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine's High-Tech Company of the Year. The company, founded in 1976 by Jim Goodnight, is the world's largest privately-held software maker. SAS makes software \"for collecting and analyzing massive amounts of statistical data.\"
Source:
Record #:
24289
Author(s):
Abstract:
Spencer Stolpen, an ex NBA executive, now trains, boards, and sells guard dogs for use by police forces. This article discusses how he initially became involved with the guard dog business.
Record #:
4442
Abstract:
Computer technology creates businesses across the state and also provides solutions to keeping older companies in business. Gray examines a start-up software company in Durham, WebWide Information Systems, Inc., and looks at two older companies, Royal Park Uniforms, Inc. in Prospect Hill and Century Valdese, Inc. in Hickory, to see how new technology helped the companies stay competitive.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Feb 2000, p24-25, 27-30, 33-47, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4484
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wendell Murphy, owner of Rose Hill-based Murphy Family Farms, Inc., made hog farming big business in the state. His company was once the nation's top producer, valued at $750 million in 1997. However, overproduction caused prices to fall to the worse level since the Great Depression. Hog lagoon spills were headlined in the press. In 2000, Murphy sold his hog operation to Virginia-based Smithfield Foods, Inc.
Source:
Record #:
4546
Author(s):
Abstract:
Virginia's and South Carolina's ports do twice the business of North Carolina's two ports of Morehead City and Wilmington. To make the port of Wilmington competitive, North Carolina and the federal government will begin a project in July 2000 to deepen the port and 26 miles of river from 38 to 42 feet. The five-year project will cost $339 million. When the project is completed, 85 percent of the world's commercial fleet can sail into Wilmington. Some, however, feel dredging will not help, since Wilmington lacks the natural advantages of the other ports.
Source:
Record #:
4548
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tim and Tick Clancy are CEO and COO of Clancy & Theys Construction Company in Raleigh. Their company is the state's seventh-largest construction company with earnings of $284.5 million in 1999. The brothers' office facilities are modest, without the usual CEO trappings, and they operate their company the old-fashioned way: tell the truth; make no excuses; give the customer what he wants; and let the work speak for itself.
Record #:
4694
Author(s):
Abstract:
After high school graduation in 1965, Darleen Johns went to work as a secretary in state government. Today she is president and owner of Alphanumeric Systems Inc. in Raleigh. In 1999, the 220-employee company earned $60 million. Alphanumeric, which Johns started in 1979, sells, installs, and services the hardware and software used to create computer networks. Johns is Business North Carolina's first Businesswoman of the Year.
Source:
Record #:
4716
Author(s):
Abstract:
Molly Broad, president of the 16-campus University of North Carolina system, was hired in 1997. Although she is not a native and does not have the \"old school\" connections that her predecessors had, she is highly rated as the system's CEO. Now she is facing her biggest challenge - convincing citizens to vote for the $3.1 billion bond referendum in the November 2000 election. Without its passage, both the university and the community college systems will be denied needed funds for repairs and new construction on their campuses.
Source:
Record #:
4713
Author(s):
Abstract:
Meg Scott Phipps is the daughter and granddaughter of North Carolina governors - Bob Scott and Kerr Scott. A Democrat, Phipps is seeking the position of North Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture in the November 2000 election. Her platform includes an 18-month moratorium on farm foreclosures, establishing a team to assist farmers facing financial crisis, reorganization of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture, and increasing the number of produced inspectors.
Source:
Record #:
24290
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bill Cavanaugh is chairman, president, and CEO of Carolina Power and Light Co., and brightened the company's prospects by buying Florida Progress Corp. in Florida and turning the business into a super regional power.