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49 results for "Gray, Tim"
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Record #:
4694
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After high school graduation in 1965, Darleen Johns went to work as a secretary in state government. Today she is president and owner of Alphanumeric Systems Inc. in Raleigh. In 1999, the 220-employee company earned $60 million. Alphanumeric, which Johns started in 1979, sells, installs, and services the hardware and software used to create computer networks. Johns is Business North Carolina's first Businesswoman of the Year.
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4716
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Molly Broad, president of the 16-campus University of North Carolina system, was hired in 1997. Although she is not a native and does not have the \"old school\" connections that her predecessors had, she is highly rated as the system's CEO. Now she is facing her biggest challenge - convincing citizens to vote for the $3.1 billion bond referendum in the November 2000 election. Without its passage, both the university and the community college systems will be denied needed funds for repairs and new construction on their campuses.
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4713
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Meg Scott Phipps is the daughter and granddaughter of North Carolina governors - Bob Scott and Kerr Scott. A Democrat, Phipps is seeking the position of North Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture in the November 2000 election. Her platform includes an 18-month moratorium on farm foreclosures, establishing a team to assist farmers facing financial crisis, reorganization of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture, and increasing the number of produced inspectors.
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Record #:
5334
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Durham-based Cree Inc. is a runner-up in BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA's High-Tech Company of the Year competition. Cree, founded in 1987, makes high-tech products, such as its light-emitting diodes. The company employs 940 and had revenues of $177 million in fiscal 2001.
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5336
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Durham-based Red Hat Inc. is a runner-up in BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA's High-Tech Company of the Year competition. Red Hat Inc., founded in 1993, is a maker of computer software and employs 600.
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5335
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Charlotte-based Digital Optics Corp. is a runner-up in BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA's High-Tech Company of the Year competition. Digital Optics, founded in 1991, makes high-tech products, such as its photonic chip. The company employs 115.
Record #:
5479
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Cary-based SAS Institute Inc. is BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine's High-Tech Company of the Year. The company, founded in 1976 by Jim Goodnight, is the world's largest privately-held software maker. SAS makes software \"for collecting and analyzing massive amounts of statistical data.\"
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Record #:
5718
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The editors of BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA ranked the state's most powerful people. Individuals considered had to make their power felt in the business world, whether they owned or ran a business or not. Included are Hugh McColl, Chairman and CEO, Bank of America; Marc Basnight, President pro tem, N.C. Senate; Nan Keohane, President, Duke University; and Jack Cecil, President, Biltmore Farms Inc., Asheville.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 19 Issue 7, July 1999, p28-33, 35-38, 40-41 Periodical Website
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Record #:
5844
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David Griffin, Jr. is vice-president of the family business, D. H. Griffin Wrecking. The company is the Southeast's largest and the country's third-largest wrecking company. Gray discusses the work of Griffin and the company at the clean-up of the World Trade Center in New York.
Record #:
6207
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Cheer Ltd. is BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine's 2003 North Carolina Small Business of the Year. The company, founded by Gwen Holtsclaw in Fayetteville in 1988, employs ten and plans and holds cheerleading camps, competitions, and coaching clinics. Cheer Ltd. also sells cheerleading merchandise. Revenue projections for 2003 are $2.5 million.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 23 Issue 12, Dec 2003, p30-32, 34, 36, 38, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
6943
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T. W. Garner Food Co. is BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine's 2004 North Carolina Small Business of the Year. The company, founded by Thad W. Garner in Winston-Salem in 1929, makes and sells sauces, jams, jellies, and preserves. Texas Pete, the best-selling hot sauce in the South and No. 3 in the country, is one of Garner Food's most-recognized products. The family-owned company employs about sixty-five and projects revenues of $20 million in 2004.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 24 Issue 12, Dec 2004, p34-36, 38, 40, 42-43, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
7282
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In January, 2005, the sale of the 50,000-circulation Durham daily, The Herald-Sun, to the Paxton Media Group of Paducah, KY was completed. Paxton owns twenty-eight other newspapers around the nation with an average circulation of 30,000. On the day the sale was completed, Paxton Media fired and escorted to the parking lot members of the Herlad-Sun's staff, starting with the paper's publisher and president. Approximately eighty positions were eliminated. Gray discusses the takeover; the emphasis given to the firings and takeover by the Raleigh News and Observer and Durham's Independent Weekly and whether the emphasis was justified or not; and what the new ownership will mean to the Durham Herlad-Sun and its readers.
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Record #:
7644
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Erskine Bowles, the new president of the University of North Carolina system, is BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine Mover and Shaker of the Year. Bowles was head of the U.S. Small Business Administration, chief of staff in President William Jefferson Clinton's White House, and a twice-defeated candidate for the U.S. Senate prior to his appointment. Supporters feel his diplomatic deftness, financial insight, national experience, and North Carolina background make him an excellent choice for the position.
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Record #:
7709
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Charles Sanders opposed the lottery in North Carolina and contributed money to the campaign against it. Yet Governor Michael Easley appointed Sanders to head the nine-member panel which will oversee it. Gray discusses the controversy surrounding the lottery. The games are expected to take in $1.2 billion with $425 million going to education across the state.
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Record #:
8007
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Public interest in weight loss is soaring. In Durham are three nationally known weight-loss clinics--Rice Diet Program LLC, Structure House Inc., and Duke University's Diet and Fitness Center. Each year around 3,000 dieters come to Durham from across the country and around the world. More participants could be accepted, but program directors say expansion would hurt their ability to serve their patients. Dieters contribute about $30 million to Durham's economy through fees that the programs charge, hotel rooms rented for weeks or months, and purchases from local retailers. Gray discusses the different diet programs.
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