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29 results for "Foushee, Rodney"
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Record #:
3594
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With populations of a number of songbirds in decline, state biologists are participating in the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) Program. Demographic data will help explain the decline as well as provide data on conserving birds.
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Record #:
3589
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The bald eagle was nearly eradicated in the state by the 1970s. Habitat destruction, human encroachment, and DDT had devastated the population. Wildlife reintroduction efforts have restored the bird to thirteen counties.
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Record #:
3592
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Removal of the Quaker Neck Dam on the Neuse River near Goldsboro opens up 75 miles of the river, plus tributaries, to spawning fish, including striped bass. Built in 1952, the 260-foot dam was the first one in the state removed for environmental reasons.
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Record #:
3536
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Purchased with $3 million in private funds, the skeleton of an Arcocanthasauras dinosaur will be displayed in 1999 at the new N.C. State Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh. It will be the only one of its kind exhibited in the world.
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Record #:
3742
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Cases of rabies have increased from 71 in 1993 to almost 900 in 1997. Although cats, rabbits, beavers, and cows have been found to be rabid, the prime carrier of the disease continues to be raccoons.
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Record #:
3969
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Before the 1980s, some of the best largemouth bass fishing was found in Currituck Sound. However, various factors, including increased salinity and the disappearance of aquatic vegetation, led to its decline, along with supporting businesses. Twenty years later, selected area restocking and the return of aquatic vegetation are helping to restore the fishery.
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Record #:
3785
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The 1998 state waterfowl stamps and print feature Canadian geese and the historic Currituck Shooting Club in Corolla. Money from sales supports the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's Waterfowl Fund.
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Record #:
3916
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A hundred years ago the state's oystermen annually harvested over 2.5 million bushels. However, overharvesting by dredging, lack of fishing law enforcement, pollution, coastal development, and, since 1989, a naturally occurring oyster disease have all but destroyed the industry. Today about 40,000 bushels are harvested yearly.
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Record #:
4342
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The job of a wildlife officer is hard and dangerous. Chances of being killed are seven times higher than in other types of law enforcement. Over 1,000 apply for positions each year, but only 20 are chosen. Those selected undergo a rigorous sixteen-week training session at Salemburg that includes learning the basics of law enforcement, use of firearms, self-defense tactics, chase procedures, and evidence collection.
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Record #:
4896
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Once almost 30 rice plantations producing millions of pounds of rice annually lined the lower Cape Fear River and its tributaries. Rice grew there from the 18th-century till the last harvest in 1931. Today the land is a refuge for wildlife. The North Carolina Coastal Land Trust has conserved 4,000 acres of this land and seeks to save more before developers can move in.
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Record #:
4988
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To save the brook trout in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the National Park Service banned fishing for it in 1978. The brook trout is the only trout native to the Eastern United States. Foushee discusses how the trout became an endangered species and the work of Steve Moore and others to preserve it.
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Record #:
5148
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The North Carolina Wildlife Commission's special permits provide hunters with \"a chance at a quality hunt on public land.\" Foushee describes the way to apply for a permit, the areas throughout the state where the hunts take place, and the types of hunts, including mourning dove, white-tailed deer, waterfowl, and wild turkey.
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Record #:
5766
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The Jean Dale was crafted by famed Harkers Island boatbuilder Brady Lewis in the 1940s as a commercial workboat. As the fishing industry has declined, few of the old boats remain. Foushee discusses the project to restore the Jean Dale, one of Core Sound's most important fishing boats.
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Record #:
4615
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A proposal by Wisconsin Tissue to build a $180 million paper mill on the Roanoke River near Weldon has raised environmental concerns among biologists, environmentalists, and fishermen. The planned discharge of 9 million gallons of wastewater per day into the river threatens the river's booming striped bass population, which was declared recovered in 1997. A number of species also live next to the mill site. Wisconsin Tissue will submit an environmental impact study.