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29 results for "Foushee, Rodney"
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Record #:
5766
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The Jean Dale was crafted by famed Harkers Island boatbuilder Brady Lewis in the 1940s as a commercial workboat. As the fishing industry has declined, few of the old boats remain. Foushee discusses the project to restore the Jean Dale, one of Core Sound's most important fishing boats.
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Record #:
4896
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Once almost 30 rice plantations producing millions of pounds of rice annually lined the lower Cape Fear River and its tributaries. Rice grew there from the 18th-century till the last harvest in 1931. Today the land is a refuge for wildlife. The North Carolina Coastal Land Trust has conserved 4,000 acres of this land and seeks to save more before developers can move in.
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Record #:
4988
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To save the brook trout in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the National Park Service banned fishing for it in 1978. The brook trout is the only trout native to the Eastern United States. Foushee discusses how the trout became an endangered species and the work of Steve Moore and others to preserve it.
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Record #:
5148
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The North Carolina Wildlife Commission's special permits provide hunters with \"a chance at a quality hunt on public land.\" Foushee describes the way to apply for a permit, the areas throughout the state where the hunts take place, and the types of hunts, including mourning dove, white-tailed deer, waterfowl, and wild turkey.
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Record #:
4570
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The destruction by the Marines of the 250-foot-long concrete Rains Mill Dam on the Little River in Johnston County will open 50 more miles of the river to fish spawning. The dam stood for 71 years and was blown up in December 1999. It is the third dam on the Little and Neuse rivers to be removed for environmental purposes since 1997. The removal will help restore the ecosystem, river system, and fisheries.
Record #:
4613
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The floods resulting from Hurricane Floyd's deluge were North Carolina's greatest natural disaster. Foushee assesses the impact the floods had on wildlife, fisheries, and the Pamlico Sound.
Record #:
4833
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Mercury is one of the earth's most poisonous substances. Coal-fired power plants, medical and municipal incinerators, and some mercury-using, chemical manufacturing plants contribute highly to North Carolina's mercury pollution problems. Because of elevated mercury levels in fish over the past decade, the state has issued advisories to avoid eating fish in ten eastern streams and one species in the Atlantic Ocean.
Record #:
4085
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The state black bear record, and perhaps the world record, was broken in November, 1998, when Coy Parton killed an 880-pound bear near Vanceboro in Craven County. The bear exceeded the old state record by 160 pounds.
Record #:
4587
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Core Sound was a sportsman's paradise for waterfowl shooting during the 19th- and early 20th-centuries. Wealthy hunters came from New York, New Jersey, and other northeastern states to shoot waterfowl and enjoy the comforts of clubs, including the Pilentary Hunting Club, Carteret Gun and Rod Club, and the Harbor Island Gun Club. Babe Ruth and future president Franklin D. Roosevelt were among the notables who hunted the area. Though the clubs are closed, their legacy of 100 years remains.
Record #:
4615
Abstract:
A proposal by Wisconsin Tissue to build a $180 million paper mill on the Roanoke River near Weldon has raised environmental concerns among biologists, environmentalists, and fishermen. The planned discharge of 9 million gallons of wastewater per day into the river threatens the river's booming striped bass population, which was declared recovered in 1997. A number of species also live next to the mill site. Wisconsin Tissue will submit an environmental impact study.
Record #:
4342
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The job of a wildlife officer is hard and dangerous. Chances of being killed are seven times higher than in other types of law enforcement. Over 1,000 apply for positions each year, but only 20 are chosen. Those selected undergo a rigorous sixteen-week training session at Salemburg that includes learning the basics of law enforcement, use of firearms, self-defense tactics, chase procedures, and evidence collection.
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Record #:
3778
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Funding to conserve nongame species, including songbirds and reptiles, is declining. Teaming with Wildlife, a national funding initiative, is a possible solution. If politicians agree, a small tax would be placed on outdoor equipment. This would earn $8 million for the state alone.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Spring 1998, p2-5, il
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Record #:
3595
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The state's striped bass population declined during the 1970s. Because of migration patterns, multi-state cooperation was needed to manage recovery. The 1984 federal Atlantic Striped Bass Conservation Act accomplished this, and the bass is now restored.
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Record #:
3594
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With populations of a number of songbirds in decline, state biologists are participating in the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) Program. Demographic data will help explain the decline as well as provide data on conserving birds.
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Record #:
3589
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The bald eagle was nearly eradicated in the state by the 1970s. Habitat destruction, human encroachment, and DDT had devastated the population. Wildlife reintroduction efforts have restored the bird to thirteen counties.
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