NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


34 results for "Elliston, Jon"
Currently viewing results 16 - 30
Previous
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
23870
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ben Lovett is a rock 'n' roll filmmaker who left Hollywood for Asheville, North Carolina. He spends his time filming videos, writing and recording music, and scoring films.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
23874
Author(s):
Abstract:
At an annual ceremony at the Carl Sandburg Home in Flat Rock, North Carolina, immigrants from around the world officially become U.S. citizens.
Source:
Record #:
23877
Author(s):
Abstract:
Documentary filmmaker Jeremy Seifert resides just outside Asheville and met with WNC Magazine to discuss his filmmaking inspirations and upcoming projects. Seifert focuses on topics related to food and consumption in America.
Source:
Record #:
23858
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jazz singer Nina Simone's 1933 childhood home in Tryon will be restored and protected for years to come after a Kansas-based company, Nineteenth-Century restoration, offered to carry out a complete makeover.
Subject(s):
Record #:
22220
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rafael Guastavino was an accomplished Spanish architect when he came to the United States in 1881. His first major work was the Boston Library which made him famous in the East and soon caught the eye of George W. Vanderbilt, who commissioned him in 1890 to build the arches at Biltmore Estate in Asheville. Guastavino had developed and patented the technique, known as the Tile Arch System in 1885. He later built his own retirement home, a twenty-five room structure near Black Mountain. In North Carolina his work is found in Duke Chapel in Durham, the Jefferson Standard Building in Greensboro, the Motley Memorial in Chapel Hill, and Basilica Shrine of St. Mary in Wilmington. He is buried in the crypt of the Basilica of St. Lawrence, Asheville, which was one of his last projects.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
22269
Author(s):
Abstract:
Long before there were websites and e-mails, travelers who wanted to send home pictures of where they were relied on postcards. In 1914, Lamar LeCompte started the Asheville Post Card Company in Asheville. His products cost a penny to purchase and another penny to mail. The cards also helped launch the region as a tourist destination. The company closed in the late 1970s, but the postcards live on in books, articles, archives, museums, and online collections.
Source:
Record #:
22274
Author(s):
Abstract:
For years many collections of Western NC's historical records have been stored in the State Archives in Raleigh. However, as of August 10, 2014, Western NC will have its own official archive dedicated to the region. Its collections will be housed in a former Veterans' Administration nurses' dormitory in Asheville.
Source:
Record #:
22276
Author(s):
Abstract:
Henry River Mill Village was an abandoned and weathering collection of twenty-some buildings until Hollywood came calling to use it for scenes in the blockbuster movie, The Hunger Games. Now there is a growing interest in preserving what is left of the village. Elliston recounts some of the village's history.
Source:
Record #:
22290
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1890 a geyser was built on the grounds of the Round Knob Hotel, a favorite railroad stop in Old Fort, and it ceased functioning in 1903. Enter George Baker, a New York banker and board member of many railroad companies. He commissioned a new one to be built to honor his friend, Colonel Alexander Andrews, a noted Confederate soldier who oversaw the building of the Western North Carolina Railroad, and the 120 men who died building it through the NC mountains. In 2012, Andrews Geyser marked its 100 years of operation.
Source:
Record #:
22286
Author(s):
Abstract:
The authors explore the thoughts of four visionaries in Western North Carolina. They are David McConville, "who projects visuals from across the universe to explore the world and its complexities," Appalachian State University research analyst and visionary Stan Thompson, who are "pushing clean rail transport into the future, " and engineer and musician Cyril Lance who "is honoring the legacy of Bob Moog by advancing electronic innovation."
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Oct 2012, p38-45, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
23824
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eunice Kathleen Waymon (1933-2003), the jazz singer known better by her stage name Nina Simone, was born in Tryon, North Carolina. Though the original house of Simone's childhood still stands, it is soon to be sold, causing the fate of this historic home to be uncertain.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May 2011, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
23823
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Civil War deeply divided Western North Carolina. The author provides a brief chronology of the conflict in the region and notes the current activities of area groups marking the 150th anniversary of the war.
Source:
Record #:
23854
Author(s):
Abstract:
Overlooking the Johns River Gorge in Blowing Rock, North Carolina, Walter Alexander built Mayview Manor and introduced a new standard of Appalachian splendor. The history of this Manor lives on in photographs, even after it was closed in 1966 and demolished in 1978.
Source:
Record #:
23813
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lawrence Mazzanovich (1871-1959) was a famous impressionist style painter who eventually settled in Tryon, North Carolina. He was part of the Tryon Artist Colony, which included many artists from the early 1900s who were based out of Tryon.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 4 Issue 6, August 2010, p28-31, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
7051
Author(s):
Abstract:
The U.S. Navy's plan to build an outlying landing field (OLF) in eastern North Carolina for jet fighters to practice aircraft carrier landings on land is drawing fire from numerous groups, both in-state and without. The Navy plans to acquire 30,000 acres in Beaufort and Washington Counties in land near the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. Since tundra swans and snow geese fly the skies in large numbers over the proposed landing area five months out of the year, safety is a major concern for wildlife, pilots, and the public. Other points of opposition are that the field will employ few local people, be a major source of jet noise, and be a drain on the two counties' tax bases.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 3, Jan 2005, p18-20, il, map Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text: