NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


34 results for "Elliston, Jon"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
34379
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carl Ernest Duckett, born in Swannanoa, North Carolina in 1923, served as the Central Intelligence Agency’s top science official. A collection of declassified documents unveiled Duckett’s role as a key player in high-tech espionage at the height of the Cold War, which he quietly helped win. Duckett oversaw secret programs including U-2 surveillance flights, the agency’s CORONA spy satellites, and its Glomar Explorer mission to raise a sunken Soviet nuclear submarine from the ocean’s depths.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
34415
Author(s):
Abstract:
The late Samuel J. Ervin, Jr. was the United States Senator whose investigation of the Watergate affair and related abuses led to President Richard Nixon’s political demise. As both the public record and declassified papers show, Ervin was willing to wade into some of the country’s most vexing questions of law and order. Born in Morganton, North Carolina in 1896, Ervin played a key role in the 1954 deliberations about Senator Joseph McCarthy, and laws regarding Americans’ rights to privacy and freedom from government meddling.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
34416
Author(s):
Abstract:
There has long been a plentiful demand for native Western North Carolina gems and minerals. Alan Schabilion’s family business, Emerald Village in Little Switzerland, is a thriving tribute to the Spruce Pine Mining District, an area that has claimed more than seven-hundred mines that have yielded more than one-hundred different gems, minerals, and rocks. These minerals have been a crucial part of the region’s natural history, culture, and economy.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
27669
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born and raised in Jackson County, North Carolina, “Dr.” John Brinkley became a wealthy man as a swindler. He spent most of his adult life performing questionable medical treatments, building a radio station to draw in customers, and running for office. Although he spent most of his life living in Kansas and Texas, Brinkley still visited Jackson County and owned property there.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
29603
Author(s):
Abstract:
For decades, Steve Martin has evolved and diversified his career, finding a refuge in bluegrass of late. In an interview with Martin, he discusses his banjo playing, song writing, life in Asheville, and his band the Steep Canyon Rangers.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
29598
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1938 Masonic Marker is located seventeen miles from Waynesville, North Carolina at the Balsam Gap Camp entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The marker is a monument featuring over six-hundred stones and minerals collected from other shrines, including Plymouth Rock, an Egyptian pyramid, and the White House.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
24838
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tourism agencies call Western North Carolina “The Land of the Sky,” but few know the history of how the phrase was coined. In 1875, Salisbury author Frances Fisher Tiernan. known professionally as Christian Reid, published “The Land of the Sky; or, Adventures in Mountain By-Ways,” which was set in Western North Carolina. The book was extremely popular and within a few years, the title became a common marketing phrase for hotels and other businesses in the region.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
26912
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great Flood of 1916 wreaked destruction in Western North Carolina. After a recording breaking 22 inches in 24 hours, the French Broad crested at over 23 feet. Memories of the resulting devastation in Asheville, Henderson County, Rutherford County, and Gaston County, still haunt the area. Building codes and general awareness keep Western North Carolina citizens prepared for the next major storm.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
23621
Author(s):
Abstract:
After a 2013 health survey, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is more aware of their tribe's health concerns and needs. New plans are in place to improve their quality of life by building a Cherokee Indian Hospital, expanding staff, and reviving community programs.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
23906
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1975, Elvis Presley performed three shows in Asheville. Residents and attendees of those concerts remember Presley's visit as they prepare for celebrating the event's 40th anniversary.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 9 Issue 4, July/Aug 2015, p48-50, 52-53, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
24123
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hart Square is a historic site in Catawba County that consists of buildings collected from farms and ridges throughout Western North Carolina and the Piedmont. The village portrays the life of average people in nineteenth and early-twentieth century Western North Carolina and hosts a number of events to keep this history alive.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
34989
Author(s):
Abstract:
Efforts were being made to improve health outcomes for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. The Tribal Health Assessment (THA) noted widespread incidences of chronic diseases and mental illnesses. These health issues are being combatted through measures such as the construction of a new hospital and the Healthy Roots program, offering fresh vegetables grown at two local youth gardens
Record #:
22334
Author(s):
Abstract:
Elliston recounts the life of \"Moms\" Mabley, the trailblazing Brevard-born comedienne. Born Loretta May Aiken, her early days in show business were confined to the segregated black night club and theatrical circuits. In the 1930s she adopted the stage name of Jackie \"Moms\" Mabley, a colorfully dressed bag lady. Eventually she crossed over to success in films, best-selling records, and TV variety shows, like Ed Sullivan's. From the 1930s until her death in 1975 she was the country's reigning black comediennes.
Source:
Record #:
22346
Author(s):
Abstract:
At 6,683 feet Mt. Mitchell in Western North Carolina is the highest peak east of the Mississippi River. Before the building of the Blue Ridge Parkway, visitors had two ways of reaching the summit--the Mt. Mitchell Railroad which opened in 1915 and the Mt. Mitchell Motor Road which opened in 1922.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
22354
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1913 Fred Seely put his mark on Asheville with the completion of the Grove Park Inn. In 1914, he began work on a family home, a castle that would stand on a 29-acre site on the crest of nearby Sunset Mountain. Called Overlook, aka Seely's Castle, it was sold by his wife in 1949. Since then it has passed through five known owners, including Asheville-Biltmore College, the predecessor of UNC-Asheville, and Jerry Sternberg, a local businessman and raconteur.
Source: