NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


34 results for "Elliston, Jon"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
23824
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eunice Kathleen Waymon (1933-2003), the jazz singer known better by her stage name Nina Simone, was born in Tryon, North Carolina. Though the original house of Simone's childhood still stands, it is soon to be sold, causing the fate of this historic home to be uncertain.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May 2011, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
5000
Author(s):
Abstract:
Elliston describes the Hi Mom! Film Festival, which is an annual gathering of short-film buffs and a presentation of their work. The festival, now in its fourth year, was started by members of the Carolina Production Guild and is currently run by Mike Conner and Kendra Gaeta.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 18 Issue 9, Feb 2001, p58-59, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
22276
Author(s):
Abstract:
Henry River Mill Village was an abandoned and weathering collection of twenty-some buildings until Hollywood came calling to use it for scenes in the blockbuster movie, The Hunger Games. Now there is a growing interest in preserving what is left of the village. Elliston recounts some of the village's history.
Source:
Record #:
5011
Author(s):
Abstract:
Erika Frederick is a familiar name on the Triangle Area filmmaking scene. Frederick helped found the North Carolina Media Arts Consortium. Three years ago she and her husband moved to New York. This year a 13-minute film she produced, My Courier, which is an adaptation of an O. Henry short story, was nominated for an Academy Award in the live-action short film category.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 18 Issue 11, Mar 2001, p28, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
23813
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lawrence Mazzanovich (1871-1959) was a famous impressionist style painter who eventually settled in Tryon, North Carolina. He was part of the Tryon Artist Colony, which included many artists from the early 1900s who were based out of Tryon.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 4 Issue 6, August 2010, p28-31, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27669
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born and raised in Jackson County, North Carolina, “Dr.” John Brinkley became a wealthy man as a swindler. He spent most of his adult life performing questionable medical treatments, building a radio station to draw in customers, and running for office. Although he spent most of his life living in Kansas and Texas, Brinkley still visited Jackson County and owned property there.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
22286
Author(s):
Abstract:
The authors explore the thoughts of four visionaries in Western North Carolina. They are David McConville, "who projects visuals from across the universe to explore the world and its complexities," Appalachian State University research analyst and visionary Stan Thompson, who are "pushing clean rail transport into the future, " and engineer and musician Cyril Lance who "is honoring the legacy of Bob Moog by advancing electronic innovation."
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Oct 2012, p38-45, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
24838
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tourism agencies call Western North Carolina “The Land of the Sky,” but few know the history of how the phrase was coined. In 1875, Salisbury author Frances Fisher Tiernan. known professionally as Christian Reid, published “The Land of the Sky; or, Adventures in Mountain By-Ways,” which was set in Western North Carolina. The book was extremely popular and within a few years, the title became a common marketing phrase for hotels and other businesses in the region.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
24123
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hart Square is a historic site in Catawba County that consists of buildings collected from farms and ridges throughout Western North Carolina and the Piedmont. The village portrays the life of average people in nineteenth and early-twentieth century Western North Carolina and hosts a number of events to keep this history alive.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
23906
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1975, Elvis Presley performed three shows in Asheville. Residents and attendees of those concerts remember Presley's visit as they prepare for celebrating the event's 40th anniversary.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 9 Issue 4, July/Aug 2015, p48-50, 52-53, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
22354
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1913 Fred Seely put his mark on Asheville with the completion of the Grove Park Inn. In 1914, he began work on a family home, a castle that would stand on a 29-acre site on the crest of nearby Sunset Mountain. Called Overlook, aka Seely's Castle, it was sold by his wife in 1949. Since then it has passed through five known owners, including Asheville-Biltmore College, the predecessor of UNC-Asheville, and Jerry Sternberg, a local businessman and raconteur.
Source:
Record #:
3858
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recently declassified documents of the Vietnam era reveal that the FBI maintained surveillance and files on peace activists on Triangle campuses, including Duke and Chapel Hill. Student phones were wiretapped, smear campaigns were conducted, and rooms were bugged.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 16 Issue 35, Sept 1998, p19-23, 25, il Periodical Website
Record #:
23877
Author(s):
Abstract:
Documentary filmmaker Jeremy Seifert resides just outside Asheville and met with WNC Magazine to discuss his filmmaking inspirations and upcoming projects. Seifert focuses on topics related to food and consumption in America.
Source:
Record #:
22269
Author(s):
Abstract:
Long before there were websites and e-mails, travelers who wanted to send home pictures of where they were relied on postcards. In 1914, Lamar LeCompte started the Asheville Post Card Company in Asheville. His products cost a penny to purchase and another penny to mail. The cards also helped launch the region as a tourist destination. The company closed in the late 1970s, but the postcards live on in books, articles, archives, museums, and online collections.
Source:
Record #:
5268
Author(s):
Abstract:
Central Carolina Community College began its Sustainable Farming Program in 1995 and in the fall of 2002 will begin granting associate degrees in the program. Sustainable agriculture is defined as a way of farming that does not erode, deplete, or poison the soil with chemical fertilizers. What makes this particular program unique is that it targets first-time farmers who have no family farming history.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 19 Issue 7, Feb 2002, p17, 19, il Periodical Website
Full Text: