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34 results for "Elliston, Jon"
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Record #:
3858
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Recently declassified documents of the Vietnam era reveal that the FBI maintained surveillance and files on peace activists on Triangle campuses, including Duke and Chapel Hill. Student phones were wiretapped, smear campaigns were conducted, and rooms were bugged.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 16 Issue 35, Sept 1998, p19-23, 25, il Periodical Website
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5000
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Elliston describes the Hi Mom! Film Festival, which is an annual gathering of short-film buffs and a presentation of their work. The festival, now in its fourth year, was started by members of the Carolina Production Guild and is currently run by Mike Conner and Kendra Gaeta.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 18 Issue 9, Feb 2001, p58-59, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5011
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Erika Frederick is a familiar name on the Triangle Area filmmaking scene. Frederick helped found the North Carolina Media Arts Consortium. Three years ago she and her husband moved to New York. This year a 13-minute film she produced, My Courier, which is an adaptation of an O. Henry short story, was nominated for an Academy Award in the live-action short film category.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 18 Issue 11, Mar 2001, p28, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5268
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Central Carolina Community College began its Sustainable Farming Program in 1995 and in the fall of 2002 will begin granting associate degrees in the program. Sustainable agriculture is defined as a way of farming that does not erode, deplete, or poison the soil with chemical fertilizers. What makes this particular program unique is that it targets first-time farmers who have no family farming history.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 19 Issue 7, Feb 2002, p17, 19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7051
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The U.S. Navy's plan to build an outlying landing field (OLF) in eastern North Carolina for jet fighters to practice aircraft carrier landings on land is drawing fire from numerous groups, both in-state and without. The Navy plans to acquire 30,000 acres in Beaufort and Washington Counties in land near the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. Since tundra swans and snow geese fly the skies in large numbers over the proposed landing area five months out of the year, safety is a major concern for wildlife, pilots, and the public. Other points of opposition are that the field will employ few local people, be a major source of jet noise, and be a drain on the two counties' tax bases.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 3, Jan 2005, p18-20, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22220
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Rafael Guastavino was an accomplished Spanish architect when he came to the United States in 1881. His first major work was the Boston Library which made him famous in the East and soon caught the eye of George W. Vanderbilt, who commissioned him in 1890 to build the arches at Biltmore Estate in Asheville. Guastavino had developed and patented the technique, known as the Tile Arch System in 1885. He later built his own retirement home, a twenty-five room structure near Black Mountain. In North Carolina his work is found in Duke Chapel in Durham, the Jefferson Standard Building in Greensboro, the Motley Memorial in Chapel Hill, and Basilica Shrine of St. Mary in Wilmington. He is buried in the crypt of the Basilica of St. Lawrence, Asheville, which was one of his last projects.
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Record #:
22269
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Long before there were websites and e-mails, travelers who wanted to send home pictures of where they were relied on postcards. In 1914, Lamar LeCompte started the Asheville Post Card Company in Asheville. His products cost a penny to purchase and another penny to mail. The cards also helped launch the region as a tourist destination. The company closed in the late 1970s, but the postcards live on in books, articles, archives, museums, and online collections.
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Record #:
22274
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For years many collections of Western NC's historical records have been stored in the State Archives in Raleigh. However, as of August 10, 2014, Western NC will have its own official archive dedicated to the region. Its collections will be housed in a former Veterans' Administration nurses' dormitory in Asheville.
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Record #:
22276
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Henry River Mill Village was an abandoned and weathering collection of twenty-some buildings until Hollywood came calling to use it for scenes in the blockbuster movie, The Hunger Games. Now there is a growing interest in preserving what is left of the village. Elliston recounts some of the village's history.
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Record #:
22290
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In 1890 a geyser was built on the grounds of the Round Knob Hotel, a favorite railroad stop in Old Fort, and it ceased functioning in 1903. Enter George Baker, a New York banker and board member of many railroad companies. He commissioned a new one to be built to honor his friend, Colonel Alexander Andrews, a noted Confederate soldier who oversaw the building of the Western North Carolina Railroad, and the 120 men who died building it through the NC mountains. In 2012, Andrews Geyser marked its 100 years of operation.
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Record #:
22286
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The authors explore the thoughts of four visionaries in Western North Carolina. They are David McConville, "who projects visuals from across the universe to explore the world and its complexities," Appalachian State University research analyst and visionary Stan Thompson, who are "pushing clean rail transport into the future, " and engineer and musician Cyril Lance who "is honoring the legacy of Bob Moog by advancing electronic innovation."
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Oct 2012, p38-45, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22334
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Elliston recounts the life of \"Moms\" Mabley, the trailblazing Brevard-born comedienne. Born Loretta May Aiken, her early days in show business were confined to the segregated black night club and theatrical circuits. In the 1930s she adopted the stage name of Jackie \"Moms\" Mabley, a colorfully dressed bag lady. Eventually she crossed over to success in films, best-selling records, and TV variety shows, like Ed Sullivan's. From the 1930s until her death in 1975 she was the country's reigning black comediennes.
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Record #:
22346
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At 6,683 feet Mt. Mitchell in Western North Carolina is the highest peak east of the Mississippi River. Before the building of the Blue Ridge Parkway, visitors had two ways of reaching the summit--the Mt. Mitchell Railroad which opened in 1915 and the Mt. Mitchell Motor Road which opened in 1922.
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Record #:
22354
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In 1913 Fred Seely put his mark on Asheville with the completion of the Grove Park Inn. In 1914, he began work on a family home, a castle that would stand on a 29-acre site on the crest of nearby Sunset Mountain. Called Overlook, aka Seely's Castle, it was sold by his wife in 1949. Since then it has passed through five known owners, including Asheville-Biltmore College, the predecessor of UNC-Asheville, and Jerry Sternberg, a local businessman and raconteur.
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Record #:
23621
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After a 2013 health survey, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is more aware of their tribe's health concerns and needs. New plans are in place to improve their quality of life by building a Cherokee Indian Hospital, expanding staff, and reviving community programs.
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