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8 results for "Cranford, H.C"
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Record #:
14072
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This article provides a brief description or certain mandates passed by the University of North Carolina Board of Trustees. This article makes reference to the strictness of these laws as a way for the administration to control the student body, many of which were no longer enforced in 1948.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p39
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Record #:
14579
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Matthew Nathaniel Nunn believed he was called upon to construct a church in God's honor. In 1946, 58-year-old Nunn had been assembling this church for over six years and invested his personal savings, more than $4,000. He built the church on his property in Orange County and conducted services and bible studies for the community in the unfinished structure.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 11, Aug 1946, p3-4, 20, il
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Record #:
14774
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Betty Smith was born and raised in Brooklyn, the city which gave her the inspiration to write her novel \"A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.\" Her work was selected as Harper's Publishing Company's September Literary Guild in the summer of 1943 and reached publication by August. Before becoming a writer, the mother of two went to the University of Michigan as soon as her children were old enough to go to school. She finished her dramatic education at Yale. She moved to Chapel Hill to write professionally and that is where she wrote her first novel \"A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 1, June 1943, p27-28, por
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Record #:
14992
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About half a mile east of the village of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on a peak known as Piney Prospect, stands one of the State's unique structures - grim and ghostly Gimghoul Castle. Owned by the Order of Gimghouls, a secret organization at the University of North Carolina, the castle resembles a pre-Norman English castle. Many strange and fantastic tales surround Gimghoul Castle and Piney Prospect, such as the myth of Peter Dromgoole, killed in a duel over a maid.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 36, Feb 1943, p6-7, 24, f
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Record #:
15025
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There were many restrictions placed upon the behavior of students only several generations ago, and strange to say, most of these laws have never been revoked. For example, students were not allowed to partake in games of chance, pass out cigars during student elections, or keep poultry in their dormitories.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 50, May 1943, p1, 24, f
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Record #:
15022
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A century of literary development at the University of North Carolina is reviewed in the 100th anniversary issue of The Carolina Magazine, a monthly literary-humorous magazine published by and for students. The magazine is the oldest college publication in North Carolina and one of the six oldest such periodicals in the nation.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 48, May 1943, p8-9, 29, f
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Record #:
15018
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Co-eds at the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina in Greensboro no longer worry about the problem of locating an orchestra when the date for a big dance rolls around. They have found the answer to the music question in the new all-girl band organized by Cherry Folger of White Plains, New York.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 46, Apr 1943, p1, 14, f
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Record #:
18453
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In the field of popular music, six big time bands got their start at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Kay Kyser, the late Hal Kemp, John Scott Trotter, Skinnay Ennis, Jan Garber, and Saxie Dowell. All formed their original bands at Chapel Hill, and they, with the exception of Kemp, are still going strong.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 29, Dec 1941, p8, 23
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