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37 results for "Cecelski, David"
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Record #:
22579
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In the early twentieth century, William F. Nye Company of New Bedford, Massachusetts operated a bottlenose dolphin fishery on Hatteras Island, North Carolina. Nye specialized in the procurement and refinement of oils from dolphins and small whales as the main source for watch and clock oils. The fishery on Hatteras Island figured integrally into the maritime whaling industry, the ascendancy of clockmaking the United States, and the exploitation of southern fishing grounds by northern companies.
Record #:
34644
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At the beginning of World War II, Arthur Miller, before he became a world-renowned playwright, recorded interviews with civilians in North Carolina. Outside of Wilmington, he discussed the impacts on the shipping industry, African-American workers and strikes, and wartime attitudes against fascism. The interviews comment on the industry and population boom brought in by the wartime effort, as well as lament the loss of small-town life and cultural changes.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, 2014, p48-59, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
19509
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With the 2005 closing of Beaufort Fisheries, North Carolina's last menhaden factory, there has been an outpouring of interest in the history of the menhaden industry in the state.
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Record #:
13727
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Cecelski reports on a 2009 community oral history project in New Bern, titled \"African American Voices Between Two River.\" Over two dozen elderly black community leaders in Craven County were interviewed, and the project focused on African Americans born in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s. These individuals lived in the aftermath of one of the worst disasters in North Carolina history - the great New Bern fire of 1922.
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Carolina Comments (NoCar F 251 C38), Vol. 58 Issue 4, Oct 2010, p123-127, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
16233
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Cecelski discusses a series of interviews done with former residents of Portsmouth Island, founded in 1754 and abandoned in 1971. Stories shed light on Outer Banks history and culture.
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Record #:
31197
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David S. Cecelski has produced the first major study of slavery on the North Carolina coast, published in his book called, The Waterman’s Song. In addition to detailed descriptions of the places, society and working conditions that maritime African Americans encountered, Cecelski recounts stories of individuals who lived through these times. He also discusses the role of slave fishermen in developing the traditional fishing culture in coastal North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 3, Mar 2002, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4737
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Abstract:
Recently, historian David Cecelski discovered the only known copy of Allen Parker's Recollections of Slavery Times in the Illinois State Historical Library at Springfield. Parker, a slave in eastern Carolina, told his story in 1895, while living in Worcester, Massachusetts. Cecelski uses Parker's text to describe how slaves lived their daily lives.
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Record #:
4763
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Born into slavery in Eastern North Carolina in 1835, William Henry Singleton later wrote of his experiences in Recollections of My Slavery Days. Co-editors and annotators David Cecelski and Katherine Mellen Charron present an abridged version of the text for Independent readers.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 12, Mar 2000, p14-19, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
4784
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Englishwoman Catharine Phillips, a Quaker missionary, evangelized in the North Carolina coastal regions and as far west as Alamance County, beginning in 1753. Phillips wrote an account of her travels and work in Memories of the Life of Catharine Phillips, which was published in London in 1797.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2000, p26-29, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4851
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Goshen, in Jones County, was one of the first African American towns settled at the close of the Civil War. The author recounts the history of the community gleaned from visits with Goshen resident Hattie Brown, who learned the history from her grandmother.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2000, p27-29, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26374
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Abstract:
The North Carolina oyster industry began its ascent in the 1880s, bringing together local laborers and Chesapeake oystermen to develop a thriving economy. With this prosperity, however, came controversy and overharvesting. Now oysters have practically vanished from North Carolina.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Fall 2000, p8-9, il
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Record #:
3610
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The kitchen garden at Tryon Palace measured 16,200 square feet and was enclosed by an eight-foot-high wall. It provided the governor foods of American, European, and African origin, including squash and okra. Some, like salsify, are not common today.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 1998, p18-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3677
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From 1869 to 1870, David Coues was Army surgeon at Fort Macon. He spent endless hours studying the wildlife and writing about it. His efforts put Bogue Banks on the naturalist's map. Coues later became the foremost ornithologist of his time.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1998, p24-26, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3728
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At the beginning of the 20th-century, the tiny town of Navassa in Brunswick County was the home of Wilmington's most important industry--guano fertilizer. The Navassa Guano Company was founded in 1869, and the town grew up around it.
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Record #:
3813
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Abstract:
An unlikely pairing on Hatteras Island in 1923 of an illiterate, self-taught midwife, Bathsheba Foster (\"Mis' Bashi\") and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine graduate Blanche Nettleton Epler provides a picture of maternity care and the dangers women faced in childbirth a hundred years ago.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , High Season 1998, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website