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20 results for "Bowie, Phil"
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Record #:
8479
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Dolls are now collectors' items that can be worth large amounts of money. Old dolls, however, are often in need of repair. Charlie and Carrie Miller of New Bern specialize in this craft. Both are retired teachers from New Jersey who decided to move south to enjoy their latter years. The Millers restore dolls' wardrobes, cosmetology, teeth, eyes, and bodies. Their talents have also been seen in rebuilding old homes. The Millers chose to buy one of New Bern's historic homes. The reconstruction is complete and the home is now a stop on New Bern's tour of homes. The Millers gained notoriety for standing up to the railroad industry. After restoring their historic home, passing coal trains were switched to another track that passed within a few feet of their home. The passing trains shook the ground so hard that the Millers feared the house might be shaken off its foundation. The two decided to stand in front of a train and make it stop as they hoped to gain media attention for their cause. As of publication, no decision has been made by the railroad to change the coal train's routes.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 2, July 1983, p18-20, por
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Record #:
8606
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Once occupying a space of over a thousand acres, Bill Parker's Trent River Plantation in Pollocksville, only now spans 15 acres. The Manor House, bordered by Highway 17 and the Trent River, contains antiques from up and down the east coast, all of which are for sale. Guests can reserve one of the huge bedrooms in the Manor House and swim in the 50-foot pool, stroll along forest lanes, or go fishing on the Trent River. There are over 250 farm animals at the plantation, all of which guests can pet and feed. Local schools host field trips to the plantation just to see the animals. New ideas for tourist attractions occur to Bill Parker each year. These include moonlight river cruises, a Tennessee walking horse breeding operation, and even complete 18th-century escape weekends, offered by the Manor House working in cooperation with other area historic attractions.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 9, Feb 1983, p24-26, il
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Record #:
8635
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Emmy-award-winning CC-M Productions, managed by Clare Crawford Mason and her husband, recently came to New Bern's Tryon Palace to film reenactments of the Civil War. CC-M is making a documentary on the pivotal role Tryon Palace played in 18th-century North Carolina history. The film is sponsored by Pepsi-Cola, a company which originated in New Bern. Filmed over the span of one week, the documentary will play in the Tryon Palace auditorium and will be called “The American Palace.”
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 12, May 1983, p8-9, il, por
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Record #:
8839
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Wilbur Tyndall, president of the Pink Hill Supply Company, has been in the business of selling John Deere tractors for twenty-six years. In his large collection of farm equipment, Tyndall has a replica of the first steel two-horse plow that Deere forged in 1837. He keeps his museum in a renovated garage and it is open to the public.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 8, Jan 1981, p18-19, il
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Record #:
9158
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Willie Taglieri was a police officer in Manhattan for seven years before becoming an artist in 1958. Last year, the Kellenberger Foundation and the Craven and Jones County Art Councils put together a grant for Taglieri to pant a scaled-down mural in a former bank building in downtown New Bern. Taglieri is currently working on the full-scale mural in the courthouse and hopes to have it completed by May.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 10, Mar 1981, p10-11, il
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Record #:
35871
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This feud’s source was not of the Hatfield and McCoy ilk: it was a refinery for Carteret County. Pete Dorrance owned the business he promised was economically sound and environmentally clean. Against it was John Costlow, director of Duke University Marine Laboratory. He asserted a threat of oil spills carried an ecological damage price tag too high to pay.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p14-17
Record #:
8957
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Lex Kelly, a district engineer for the state Department of Transportation, spends his free time building scale models of bridges. Although he also sculpts and paints, bridge-building is Kelly's favorite pastime. Funds are being gathered to build a new transportation museum in Spencer, and Kelly plans to donate several of his models to it.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 4, Sept 1979, p14-15, il
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Record #:
9050
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The Scituate Coach Works of New Bern is only six years old, but has customers all over the country. The shop, owned and operated by partners Earl Harting and Cyril Brook, specializes in restoring decayed antique automobiles. Harting completes all of the woodwork while Brook focuses on the car's body.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p14-15, il
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Record #:
9592
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Susan Dougal of New Bern is one of the few expert calligraphers in the country. In her early years, she learned a dozen different styles of calligraphy with Sheila Waters, the only American member of the London Society of Scribes and Illuminators. Dougal's work can command as much as $750 for a single certificate. While she lived in Washington, D.C., she did work for the government and for the White House. Since coming to North Carolina, however, she is finding minimal demand for her art.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 10, Mar 1977, p16-17, il
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Record #:
9103
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The Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament began eighteen years ago and is held each June in Morehead City. This year's winner was Bob Donovan of Rockville, Maryland. His blue marlin was 140 inches long and weighed 575 pounds. His crew split the $1,200 prize money.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 2, July 1976, p29-31, il
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Record #:
9114
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Recently, the gravesite of Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr., was discovered. Spaight signed the U.S. Constitution and served as the first native-born North Carolina governor. He died in 1802, and his son, Richard, Jr., also served as governor and is buried in the same small cemetery as his father. The graveyard is located on Brice's Creek Road in New Bern, and the overgrowth has been cleared by a local Boy Scout Troop.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p20-21, il, por
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Record #:
9142
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Ross Morphew and his family runs a boat repair shop in Morehead City but he and his family live on a pirate ship. Morphew hired an architect to design and build the ship, and his family lives there, dressing on pirates on weekends and holidays to “attack” other boats. The State has awarded the Morphews an official privateer's commission for the success of their exploits. Their boat is called the MEKA II and is a highly popular tourist attraction.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 4, Sept 1976, p16-17, il
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Record #:
9135
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Nona Lockhart began stitching monograms as a hobby ten years ago. Since then, she has enjoyed a profitable business making hundreds of flags for boats, marinas, and clubs all across the country. Each flag is handmade and designed by Lockhart. She can be contacted in Morehead City.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 5, Oct 1976, p18-19, il, por
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Record #:
9388
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Pete Harmatuk has amassed thousands of prehistoric fossils from scouring the beds of the Neuse River. Harmatuk has developed a regular voluntary working relationship with the Smithsonian and freely donates many of his finds to the museum.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p13, 32, il, por
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Record #:
9813
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The Texasgulf Company has the right to mine phosphate, the key ingredient in fertilizer, from a 40,000-acre plot of land close to Aurora. Combined with sulphuric acid, phosphate becomes phosphoric acid, and the plant ships it product to customers who make liquid fertilizers, such as those used by the state's farmers. The company has spent six million dollars on pollution control and monitoring equipment. It has also given Smithsonian Institution paleontologists the right to search the site for prehistoric fossils, such as sharks.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 3, Aug 1975, p13-14, il
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