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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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37 results for ""Cecelski, David""
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Record #:
2054
Author(s):
Abstract:
From Colonial days through the Civil War, a number of slaves, aided by slave watermen and sympathetic whites, escaped by the Maritime Underground Railroad, an ocean-going route to freedom along the North Carolina coastline.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1994, p10-18, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2590
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many ordinary people led civil rights protests. In 1968-69, when school desegregation in Hyde County threatened the loss of two Afro-American schools, a one-year student boycott saved the schools.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 35 Issue 1, Fall 1995, p32-35, il
Record #:
2743
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1874 and 1875, Nathaniel Bishop sailed 2,500 miles in nine months, from Quebec to the Gulf of Mexico. Locally, in his fifty-six pound paper canoe, he paddled by the Outer Banks and Onslow Bay, then down the Waccamaw River.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1996, p13-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2834
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the late 1800s and early 1900s, demands by hat makers for plumage and restaurants for bird meat brought near extinction to coastal flocks. Efforts by T. Gilbert Pearson and others led to conservation laws that restored the birds by World War II.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1996, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
2913
Author(s):
Abstract:
Author and biologist Rachael Carson often visited such coastal areas as Beaufort's Town Marsh and Bird Shoal, and recorded her experiences in books, including UNDER THE SEA-WIND and THE EDGE OF THE SEA.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1996, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
3017
Author(s):
Abstract:
Travelers now are impatient if their destination is not reached in a good time. Cecil Buckman's journal of his meandering 1873 trip from Beaufort to Baltimore on the OGEECHEE reminds today's travelers that journeys in the era of sail required patience.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1996, p21-23, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3088
Author(s):
Abstract:
Across Jarrett Bay from Williston in Carteret County lies Davis Ridge, a fishing community founded by liberated slaves in 1865 and destroyed by a hurricane in 1933. The self-sufficient town enjoyed a unique, close relationship with its white neighbors.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Sept/Oct 1996, p18-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3089
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1890s, the state harvested over 2.5 million bushels of oysters yearly. However, a combination of ecological, economic, and management factors reduced the harvest to 42,000 bushels barely a hundred years later.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1996, p22-24, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
3230
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Averitt's Onslow County plantation, \"Rich Lands,\" was a leading naval stores producer 150 years ago. Although great wealth accrued to the family, uncontrolled harvesting destroyed the pines and led to the family's downfall in 1857.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1997, p21-24, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
3325
Author(s):
Abstract:
As forests were exhausted in the North, logging companies moved South. Between 1885 and 1925, Buffalo City, located in the Great Alligator Swamp in Dare and Tyrrell Counties, was one of the state's busiest sawmill towns.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1997, p19-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3417
Author(s):
Abstract:
\"Behind the Veil,\" an oral history project of Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies, is a collection of interviews of over 1,200 African-Americans who lived during the Jim Crow era in the South.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Summer 1997, p21-23, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3452
Author(s):
Abstract:
The writings of three former slaves, Allen Parker's RECOLLECTIONS OF SLAVERY TIMES, William H. Robinson's FROM LOG CABIN TO PULPIT, and William H. Singleton's RECOLLECTIONS OF MY SLAVERY DAYS, portray the late antebellum period and the Civil War.
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Record #:
3610
Author(s):
Abstract:
The kitchen garden at Tryon Palace measured 16,200 square feet and was enclosed by an eight-foot-high wall. It provided the governor foods of American, European, and African origin, including squash and okra. Some, like salsify, are not common today.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 1998, p18-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3677
Author(s):
Abstract:
From 1869 to 1870, David Coues was Army surgeon at Fort Macon. He spent endless hours studying the wildlife and writing about it. His efforts put Bogue Banks on the naturalist's map. Coues later became the foremost ornithologist of his time.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 1998, p24-26, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3700
Author(s):
Abstract:
Long-buried state documents, including field notes, transcripts, surveillance reports, and registers of members, reveal Ku Klux Klan activities during the 1960s. Over one hundred groups, with about 7,000 official members, existed statewide.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 15, Mar 1997, p11-15, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):