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10 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984
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  • 1. Champagne and Chitlins by Arthur, Billy
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Lieutenant Roy Wilder, Jr., became a missionary of the North Carolina chitlin faith during World War II. While stationed in London, Wilder received a jar of chitlins from home. With a group of fellow North Carolinians, Wilder cooked the chitlins, creating a unusual smell in the London air. Future N.C. House of Representatives speaker pro tem Allen Barbee, Greenville lawyer William W. Speight, and future Asheville Citizen editor John A. Paris were all present at the chitlin dinner. Following the Normandy invasion, Wilder made a promise to Lindsey Nelson, a future CBS sports reporter, and Don Whitehead, a future Pulitzer Prize reporter, to meet in Germany on Thanksgiving for a chitlin dinner. This did not occur, but Wilder kept his jar of chitlins and met up with the two in March 1945 in Remagen, Germany. There, the trio cooked up a southern meal complemented with champagne, donated by fellow servicemen. Newspapers, Time magazine, the comic strip Pogo, and the Air Force Diary and Magazine reported the chitlin dinner for readers in America. Wilder later sent chitlins to fellow correspondents in Korea and Vietnam.
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    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8216
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  • 7. Discovery on Lot 52 by Knapp, Richard F.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Joseph Montfort was a prominent man in colonial North Carolina. He was a clerk of the Halifax County Court, a member of the North Carolina colonial Assembly, a colonel in the militia, and a treasurer of the northern counties of the colony. In 1771 he was named Provincial Grand Master of America by the English Masonic order, the highest office an American has held in the Masonic organization. Montfort built his home in the town of Halifax on lot 52. This fashionable home existed till 1872, when it burnt down. The site was then covered with dirt and used for cotton farming. In 1972, the lot was found again using C. J. Sauthier's 1769 map. Archaeological excavations on the site began in 1978 and continued in 1979. The original foundation was uncovered, along with 1,600 other artifacts. Today a museum sits over the archaeological site. Visitors can view the foundation and other artifacts as well as tour the thirty-two-acre historic Halifax district.
    Source:
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8220
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